4K TV recommendations, advice?


#41

8-10 years. It was $1200 new.


#42

Thanks, Stuss.


#43

Wait, is it a tube tv? It will never die if so.


#44

The Sony is an LCD.


#45

Make sure to google 4k viewing distance and ensure you’re getting a TV big enough to make it worthwhile. Otherwise might as well get a lower end model and not bother with a 4k source. @stusser.


#46

Do things get blurry if you have to down-rez from the 4k to 1080P? For example on my computer LCD I use, going from native resolution (2560x1600 to 1920x1200 looks awful).


#47

I don’t think you’d get those issues due to 4k being able to perfectly match 1080p. You just assign 4 pixels to a 1080p pixel and you’re good. I could be wrong, though.


#48

If those are the real numbers, it should look awful because you’re changing aspect ratio. Your monitor and/or Windows is going to screw that up badly, probably.

If you really mean 2560x1440 -> 1920x1200 then it probably looks awful because it’s not a perfect downscale, and your monitor doesn’t have great downscaling software built in. It has to figure out which pixels to duplicate on the fly.


#49

Oops, typo. It is the exact same aspect ratio (2560x1600 to 1920x1200)

The thing that’s so challenging to deal with is text becomes so much fuzzier. Like an intense amount of FSAA has been applied - way too much to everything so there is no sharpness to any of the graphics. SO I always wondered if 4k tv’s would suffer the same issue with either normal Netflix, or PS4 stuff that is 1080p.


#50

No, 1080p stuff looks awesome on my 4K. Again, as someone pointed out above, that’s likely primarily because it’s a perfect upscale. All you have to do is 4x each pixel, no guessing or interpolating required. Plus most TVs do have some upscaling tech to make it even nicer.

Perhaps in my old age, or because I sit pretty far away from my 70" TV, it’s actually hard for me to tell 1080p vs. 4K on my TV.


#51

I have great eyesight with my glasses on, and like I said earlier, it’s really hard to tell.


#52

It’s almost impossible to buy 1080p sets above 32" anymore, and there’s rarely any savings to be had. There is very little reason not to get a 4K TV if you are buying right now.


#53

Most people sit much too far away from the TV screen. 4k is noticeable, and is pretty great. With a 50" your eyeballs when seated should be 4 feet to a max of 6 feet from the screen. I know it seems ridiculous, and most of our TV rooms aren’t even set up for it. But that’s what it takes to make it a great cinematic experience. My eyes when seated are under 7 feet from the 65 screen, which I also have on an extending wall mount to bring it a foot closer for movies. Try it!


#54

Scott, I hate to break this to you…but no matter how hard you try…EMF radiation won’t give you superpowers. I tried with the old ones and no dice, so the new ones certainly won’t do it.


#55

Ha, I’ve tried for years. It seems too close, but it’s not.

Or get a 85 and sit back a bit.


#56

I just talked my father into a 65 inch for his huge living room. After I helped him get it set up I started thinking about how to get him to go with 75 inches next time.


#57

Same here. Love it.


#58

I don’t understand this. Why avoid watching the news? Because all the computer graphics (headlines, logos, clock, etc.) stay in the same place for hours?


#59

Yeah, logos and chyrons are particularly prone to it, especially if they’re red.

I’m not saying avoid it altogether, just don’t leave the TV on the same news channel for hours on end.


#60

I’m six feet tall, so that means I can’t, like, put my feet up.

Yeah, no.