Airplane pr0n


#181

We actually use the outboard engine on the pilots side to reference the taxiway edge which is how we judge turns and things like that. The hardest thing to do on the ground is a 180 degree turn on a 150’ wide runway (standard width). Most runways have extra paved areas at each end called keyholes which are used for these turns but if a runway doesn’t that 150’ is juuuuuust enough space to make a perfectly executed 180 turn. Of course if you fuck it up you’re stuck there until they get a tug to move you and you’ve shut down the runway for awhile, doesn’t look good.

As for the AR, the vibration is just the natural result of two machines moving so close together at high speeds. The USAF has two tanker’s (currently) and each poses a unique challenge for the C-5. That video is from a KC-135 which is much smaller than the 5 and because of that, FRED tends to push them around really easily so it is very challenging to keep the jet stable and not upset the tanker. The KC-10 is bigger than the KC-135 so doesn’t get pushed around as much but it has a 3rd engine on the tail and that engine fuck with the tail of the C-5 because once you get in contact (the position where the boom can plug) the jetwash out of that 3rd engine pushes on your tail. So there is a significant change in how the C-5 controls once you get in contact and it is very easy to get pushed back out.

I can’t tell if that video is sped up or not but i would say a competent pilot can get from pre-contact (about 50 feet away) to contact (about 10-15 feet) in a few minutes or less. The key is not to be fast but to be smooth and stable. Of course you can’t take so long that you run out of gas just trying to hook up with the tanker so it is a balance.

So much of flying these days is really just programming the autopilot, air refueling is true hands on piloting and requires immense concentration and constant minor adjustments. Twenty minutes on the boom in bad weather and you’ll be completely spent mentally and physically.


#182

So you stay connected far longer than in that vid? I thought so, no way that much fuel can get pumped in just a minute or so the guys in the vid stay plugged.

That video by the way in more than one way fits this thread’s title :D

Now here’s a really perverted one. That tanker is male (it is built to plug into stuff) but the receiving aircraft is male as well (using hose-and-drogue the receiving aircraft plugs into the tanker) so they put the tanker in drag. Am I a filthy human being for reading this into this? Tranny tanker :P

And here’s something that’s just plane sexey:


#183

LOL that Vulcan was like “NOPE”


#184


#185

I can just see the gas gauge dropping like a rock as they’re doing that.


#186

The East Coast fighter squadrons are being evacuated to the old bomber base south of Columbus in advance of the oncoming hurricane today. Its pretty neat seeing the flights of F-22’s cycling in. I haven’t gotten any pictures or videos, but if I see any posted, I’ll be sure to share them here.


#187

#188

Stealth planes, anybody?
B-2 Spirit
220px-USAF_B-2_Spirit


#189

You should post a picture.


#190

Ill post my pictures from the Portland air show last weekend


#191

I know it’s covered in other threads, but this is one more place to mourn the passing of Paul Allen. He was the founder of the Flying Heritage and Combat Armor Museum, which has a particular focus on historical authenticity.

https://flyingheritage.org/


#192

That is an awesome collection! What I wouldn’t give to see an Il-2M3 in the flesh, let alone flying!

image

What a glorious machine.


#193

You spelt ‘deathtrap’ wrong.


#194

Only for the tail gunner who were expendable anyways :P


#195

2018 Frame Game
#196

So pretty.


#197

You could probably accidentally blow up a dozen of these and still not incur the same cost as one F35.

What is it? Google Image Search fails.


#198

It’s a Su-57. Formerly known as T-50. The new hot jet from the Motherland intended to go up against the F-22, F-35 and all the older stuff.

They have built about 8 or 9 so far and have a hard time funding full rate production. It’s a seriously hot jet with some very interesting systems, such as chin-mounted sidelooking radar arrays and dielectric panels all along the wing leading edges.

In about ten years it should be a serious contender.

Now here’s another interesting new(ish) thing, not as good looking as the Su-57 but still:


#199

I’m always amazed at the longevity of these airplanes. I think it’s because I’ve become used to the one year technology cycle of much of our household products. I was reading Wikipedia about one US plane (can’t remember the name now) which came into production in the early 60’s and is still in regular service. Could you imagine if we were all still driving around in cars from 1962?


#200

That’s gotta be the B-52.

And cars from 1962… that’s gotta be Cuba. :)

I think part of the reason for that is the cost and complexity of development is high. You’d think some of those could be standardized and streamlined over time like other project management and manufacturing tech, but read any story about government contracts and its pretty obvious that efficiency isn’t one of the project goals.