Airplane pr0n


#201

B-52 has been around since the 50’s.


#202

Actually, it was the Boeing RC 135


#203

I could write a 9000 word rant explaining the factors that lead to this but it would be very much P&R and I do not want to get into that. Suffice to say technical reasons are only a small part of it.


#204

How 'bout this bad boy? Officially starting production.

image


#205

How loud is it when taking off? The major points against the Concorde were:

  1. the sonic booms
  2. the loudness when taking off

If they can solve both 1 and 2 and scale upward, it would be very interesting.


#206

Frankly I have trouble visualizing that design at commercial scale. My bet is that this quickly becomes a military-only adventure.

Or maybe something with 3-4 seats for the ultra rich.


#207

There was a big chunk of the Nova on Concordes dedicated to this knitting needle thing


#208

As a business jet with 4 to 8 seats it would make a lot of sense. Shouldnae be any louder than a regular jet at takeoff, unless it’d need its afterburner on takeoff like concorde did.


#209


#210

What are you talking about?


#211

The plane might need longer runways or wider taxiing routes due to its shape, which might cancel out some destinations. Also longer hangars. The fact that it has only one engine could also be a risk.


#212

I’d point you toward the Nova episode, but for some reason they’ve gone to a “log in to your local PBS station” model, which sucks.


#213

You know…I think in the old Incredible Hulk TV Show, they use one of those to drop a big steel containment dome thing on Lou Ferrigno because they assume he’s an alien when he shows up too near a UFO site.


#214

#215

Pffft. I could do that too if I wanted to.


#216

Clearly, after bush flight sim Deadstick is a massive success, they need to do a Deadstick: Austria expansion.


#217

Military-aircraft enthusiasts watch as a United States Air Force F-15 fighter jet travels at low altitude through the “Mach Loop” series of valleys near Dolgellau, Wales, on June 26, 2018. The Mach Loop valleys are regularly used by the military for operational low-flying training, which can take place as low as 250 feet (76 meters) from the nearest terrain.

Many other great (non-airplane pr0n) pics here:


#218

I would like to see some in-cockpit footage of the Mach Loop.


#219

Here you go:


#220

Nice! Thanks!