August 2012 NPD

Here are the results:

Software

  1. Darksiders II (360, PS3, PC) - 247K
  2. New Super Mario Bros. (3DS) - 240K
  3. Kingdom Hearts 3D: Dream Drop Distance (3DS)
  4. NCAA Football 13 (360, PS3)
  5. Lego Batman 2: DC Super Heroes (Every Platform)
  6. Sleeping Dogs (360, PS3)
  7. Transformers: Fall of Cybertron (360, PS3) - 105K
  8. Batman: Arkham City (360, PS3, PC)
  9. Call of Duty: Black Ops (360, PS3, Wii)
  10. The Amazing Spider-Man (Every Platform)

And in hardware, the only folks reporting any numbers is Microsoft with 193K for the Xbox 360.

Sleeping Dogs bomba! For being pretty discussed in forums and shit, I thought SD would be higher.
If it’s just above 105k… maybe it did 115-125K.

That hardware number of the 360 is less than 2/3 of August 2011 numbers.

Black Ops? Really? That’s kind of surprisingly, really. I mean, Modern Warfare 3 maybe would be less surprising, but Black Ops is nearly two years old now.

Sleeping dogs probably did 200-300k on Steam, going by the concurrent numbers.

The Witcher 2 sold around 200k on Steam at launch according to CD Projekt. Yet that game only ever had 9,300 concurrent players at peak.

Darksiders 2 hit 8,700, and Sleeping Dogs hit more than 12,000

I’ve always heard about 10x concurrent numbers for total sales but I’d love to believe it’s higher. Really wondering how much hardcore gamers switching from the consoles to PC(that this is occurring is anecdotal to be sure) is enough to impact console retail software sales to the degree we’re seeing

The only time I’ve heard 10x is from the lead at Tripwire talking about Killing Floor - that the average concurrent numbers they see throughout the day represent at most 10% of the total number of unique people who played the game on a given day.

Not total sales, just total unique people in a day.

When you put the path together, it makes sense. How long does the average person play a game for in a day? 1 or 2 hours? Plenty of outliers of course, but 1-2 hours seems like the top-end for most people.

Then consider 24 hours in a day, so there are 12-24 “segments” of 1-2 hours in a given day. If the concurrent numbers are 10,000, then the number of unique people in a day would be (12 to 24) * (10,000) = 120,000-240,000 unique people playing the game in a day.