Best way to get cheap MSDN sub?

I might just have to bit the bullet here, but I’m looking to grab an MSDN subscription, and from what I hear there are resellers… But the MS price is about 1200$ a year.

Now, considering I can’t even get a copy of VS.Net 2003 for under $1000, that’s pretty damn good. But still a lot of money for the small portion of it I would actually use.

Is there any way to get a legit copy of the current VS.Net for under $1000? Like that nice OEM deal of Nero that JMJ found not too long ago?

I hate spending money on a compiler/IDE, but I must say with Visual Assist, .NET 2003 is damn nice.

You can buy a qualifying upgradeable piece of software (like a cheap, older version of sourcesafe), theny buy the upgrade for MSVC. Just make sure the version of software you buy qualifies to run MSVC upgrade edition:

Here’s what I did

http://www.philsteinmeyer.com/modules/news/article.php?storyid=14

[edit - fixed broken link]

Cool idea… But how do you tell if it qualifies?

nm, I found it… That’ll save a couple hundred bucks. Thanks Phil.

If you are in school, you can get discounts on most MS software, but it’s a special version that has some limitations. If you’re not going to sell it or use it for business purposes, you can always get an employee to purchase it for you, from the company store. That is what I have done ever since I moved to Seattle.

If you’re not going to sell it or use it for business purposes, you can always get an employee to purchase it for you, from the company store. That is what I have done ever since I moved to Seattle.

Yup thats what I did. Its an easy way to get it on the cheap. I mean shit if you live in or Near seattle the odds are very damn good you know at least one person that works for MS.

You can also buy the license only, and download all the ISOs yourself.

Sign up for the Microsoft Empower for ISV’s program – it gets you 5 MSDN Universal licenses for $375.

Note – you’ll have to renew the $375 payment after a year; and, the licenses get permanently expired at the end of the second year (at which point they’ll steer you towards full partner-hood). And you have to commit to developing a product for a Microsoft-based platform.

But, it’s a hell of a way to get a ton of great tools for dirt, DIRT cheap.

Sorry I don’t know how extensive your requirements are… if you need all the Team System stuff or whatever… but

Now, considering I can’t even get a copy of VS.Net 2003 for under $1000, that’s pretty damn good. But still a lot of money for the small portion of it I would actually use.

Have you seen the new VS 2005 Express editions? Good enough for many single developer tasks, and only $49. And free while beta lasts (like two weeks or something).

http://lab.msdn.microsoft.com/express/

Ick, not even close to interested in a beta IDE.

Thanks for the tip Andrew, that’s probably what I will go with. You know if you need to be incorporated to register with them as a partner?

Wow, what a byzantine maze of bullshit I need to go through to get that. I think I’m just going to call them. :)

And of course, their application process doesn’t work in Firefox at all.

Don’t think so – you sign up as a partner first (no requirements whatsoever), and from there, you join the Empower for ISV’s thingy. As far as I know, there aren’t any requirements beyond what’s listed on the linked page above.

Whatever you decide, Visual Studio 2005 was just released to manufacturing so you definitely don’t want to buy Visual Studio 2003 separately right now…

If your job involves coding or even networking, maybe your employer could buy you one? They might even be looking for stuff like this, as some employers like to maintain a roster of employee training stuff to get tax breaks.

Andrew’s right. Empower is the way to go. You basically need a website for product announcements and contact information and you’ll get approved. It doesn’t give you access to the entire MSDN catalog like a partner would have, but you’ll get Team Studio 2005. There are some small requirements for second year renewal, and then like Andrew said, you either partner up or earned enough points to buy an MSDN package.

K

Ya all those requirements are kind of scary. :)

I guess I could put that info on my website, but gah, what a bunch of bullshit. My habitual response when confronted with that much of it is to go around it. In this case that’d be just buy the MSDN sub.

I’ll have to call them today or something.

All they require is that a) you have a website, which has contact info on it somewhere; and b) you eventually (after 18 months) put a page on the site that tells about your product.

After 18 months, they just want a direct URL to the page – you probably don’t actually have to link to it from anywhere on your site.

As for signing up on the web vs. calling, it really doesn’t take that long to fill out the forms online (although you will need to fire up IE ;-))