Breath of Fire V: A Breath of Fresh Air?

http://www.tokyopia.com/reviews.asp?reviewsid=47

Monster about to get OWNED.

I mostly like the idea of urgency within a battle. The idea of hanging on by a thread. For some that may be frustrating, but without that sense of urgency, a game can really go poo.

I dont wanna feel invincible. Some of the best fights I had in an RPG were in the medicore Legend of Legaia. The amount if power in each fight, hanging on by barely anything and unleashing a combo of terrible power that is returned in full by the boss. That kinda shit rocks. Wild Arms 3 had some good boss fights too.

Supposedly you’re SUPPOSED to die often, which is weird. The review link posted above sorta confirms that the game is ALL about those moments of desperation. That rox!

Hardcore!

It’s funny how the RPG that is truely trying to do something new is getting totally ignored while Xenosaga, the overblown movie, is getting tons of attention for its pedo fodder and crappy wannabe-bible theme.

l33t!

I agree on the Xenosaga front. I have seen way too many previews in print and on the 'net that point out the abundance of cut scenes/movies in Xenosaga. Even Tech TV in their preview said that hopefully the final release of Xenosaga has more gameplay than they found in their preview copy. Xenosaga has been crossed from my “to buy” list.

Maybe it is just me aging and my tastes changing, but the last few console RPG’s I have played (specifically Suikoden III) I have tired of the story development and in-game cut scenes really quickly. Inside I am screaming, “I want to fucking fight, level, and buy shit!!!” Instead, I am punching my way through the dialog boxes and attempting to pay attention and stay interested in all of these 11 to 17 year old characters with the large heads.

I have seen precious little info on Breath of Fire V. If it is, as you hope, something new in the depressing console RPG genre, I will be happy to add it to my short list of games I am anticipating and credit another purchase to visiting Qt3.

Feel free to read the link I posted at the top o my thread. It explains in detail what makes the game different. It’s more of a dungeon crawl than a traditional PC RPG.

P.S.: I love the art direction in this game:

It certainly looks cool. I read the Tokyopia article awhile back and was intrigued. The Breath of Fire games have been pretty much standard RPGs IIRC. It’s like the developers specifically decided to do everything the “wrong” way with the game to make it “right”.

If I can rent it first, I probably will. My game buying wad will be blown on a Wind Waker pre-order. BoFV will still be here next month when I’ve got some dough again.

–Dave

That screenshot looks almost exactly how I envisioned the opening scene of Gibson’s Neuromancer. Maybe a little brighter than “a television tuned to a dead channel,” but not much.

Don’t write off Xenosaga just yet. It’s really, really good–though yes, it’s probably the most story-driven game that’s ever been made.

But put it this way: Given the choice, would you rather play an RPG padded out by one stupid random encounter after another, or one “padded out” by a really engrossing sci fi story?

Maybe that’s choosing between two evils, but I think the fact that the designers of Xenosaga decided to extend the life of the game by essentially making it a sci fi miniseries is pretty commendable. There’s no real filler in the game, and it seems to be quite lengthy (I’ve been at it for a while and no end in sight). Plus the gameplay, when it’s there, is quite good. No random battles and interesting combat. Xenosaga isn’t one for renting, and you definitely need to commit to it, but I think many RPG fans are going to go nuts for it.

I hope you’re right.

I can’t stand random battles, but there’s something very off-putting about having to sit through extended cutscenes. And is it really an engrossing story or is it more of the same psychic-robo-genetic crap that’s been spewing out of Japan for the last umpteen years.

And is it really an engrossing story or is it more of the same psychic-robo-genetic crap that’s been spewing out of Japan for the last umpteen years.

If the immensely overrated story in Final Fantasy 7 is any indication, it’s likely the latter.

-wumpus

I’ve also had my eye on this one for awhile now, I really enjoyed Breath of Fire 4 with it’s unique combo system in battle, endearing art design, and some extremely satisfying optional sidequests and minigames. Building a small town, completing the various master challenges, the intensely addictive fishing minigame. I never much cared for the Breath of Fire games during the SNES era, but BoF4 really grabbed my attention and didn’t let go. I’ve been quite excited for this sequel for a good while now and am very curious about the unique design structure it entails.

Though in the case of Xenosaga, I wouldn’t exactly say there is anything inherently wrong with having such a cinematic adventure game. With a market that keeps growing and growing as it seems to, no longer does every game have to satisfy the most dedicated and driven gamersects. Titles come and go, but what’s exactly the problem with variety? For every Xenosaga, there will always be a good chunk of alternatives for the crowd less interested in being engrossed into a ‘worldly saga’. I myself am not all that excited to watch an 80 hour movie with the occasional forced interaction,(Suikoden 3 most recently has proven to me that I can’t forcefully endure such long-winded exposition either) but I also don’t see what’s so inherently evil about it when we there is more to offer than a strict Rebublican/democratic, heads/tails match. Across several different platforms, the next few months are going to be jam packed with quite a bit of of these so called ‘RPG adventure games’ all vying for our gaming bucks. General consumers may flock to the most advertised and most flashy of the bunch, but on a message board such as this, I have no doubt we all share such a common love for this hobby that our purchasing decisions have a bit more care and research involved tuned to our own unique tastes. Let them eat their cake if they so desire, no reason to call out the pitchforks and angry mob everytime a game like Xenosaga arrives. The market is bloated enough that alternatives are everywhere.

Besides in most every review I seem to have read on Xenosaga most recently, all seem to agree that the game elements are actually quite challenging and well devised, bosses will demand lateral thinking and ingenuity to strike down, surprising most whom were expecting to breeze through the gameplay only to continue the long string of CG psychobabble. Customization and micromanagement options reach quite far for such a cinematic adventure, in fact the only real complaints any have mentioned are the strung out cutscenes and lack of variety in the musical overtures. The area layouts are supposedly inspired and interesting to travel through, and the thematic nature of the plotline can appear quite engrossing if given the proper motivational attention. It’s not as if the gameplay is broken or generally insipid as many found problematic with the first Xenogears(myself included). Though I had heard similar cries of joy about Suikoden 3 before I realized what a rather dreary game experience that turned out to be, so…

Personnally for Sci-fi adventuring, I have my own eye set on Tri-Ace’s Star Ocean 3.

Here we are discussing the very title AngryFace and I were railing against. :wink: But I guess since Mr. Face brought it up…I am still rooting for BoF V after reading the link posted up top here. That said…

Don’t write off Xenosaga just yet. It’s really, really good–though yes, it’s probably the most story-driven game that’s ever been made.

[b]But put it this way: Given the choice, would you rather play an RPG padded out by one stupid random encounter after another, or one “padded out” by a really engrossing sci fi story?

Maybe that’s choosing between two evils, but I think the fact that the designers of Xenosaga decided to extend the life of the game by essentially making it a sci fi miniseries is pretty commendable[/b]. There’s no real filler in the game, and it seems to be quite lengthy (I’ve been at it for a while and no end in sight). Plus the gameplay, when it’s there, is quite good. No random battles and interesting combat. Xenosaga isn’t one for renting, and you definitely need to commit to it, but I think many RPG fans are going to go nuts for it.[/quote]

Maybe I have just swung completely to the Strategy side of console RPG’s along the lines of FFT, but if the following statement is true from Gamespy’s recent review:

Sure, games have been getting more dialogue-heavy as of late – but XS leaves them all in the dust. Its cinemas can stretch as long as 45 minutes

45 MINUTES!!! No thanks. The reviewer admits he digs anime stuff. I dig anime movies, but games, I would rather play. Now I have not seen more than a few seconds of gameplay footage so maybe I am way off base, but when every single thing I have read makes it a point to comment on the length and frequency of these mini-movies, my hesitancy meter goes off the charts.

Plenty of these adventure games, some of which are fantastic, have cutscenes upwards 45 minutes in length. Valkyrie Profile, Alundra, and Grandia for example.

Of course whether or not that content is littered with quality writing and immersive setpieces that can keep you transfixed for that period of time to pass will differ from gamer to gamer. Who knows, maybe Xenosaga won’t rub off as a sophmoric blend of Manga-esque archetypes and religious subtext.

Well Valkyrie Profile had A LOT of great gameplay to back up the cut scenes. If I want an anime movie, Ill watch Metropolis, which also has robots and is a much better movie ;)

Haha, Kasavin invades poor MAF’s thread with Xenosaga praise… ;b

As for BoF V, I’m not quite sure if the concepts are going to elevate the game to excellence, or simply create an exercise in tedium. Either way, though, I’ll commend the devs for not falling prey to the mind numbingly conformist console RPG standards.

Xenosaga? Well, it could be good… I’m just doubting it.

I still think Dark Cloud 2 is the current great RPG. However, I have been looking forward to BoFV. One thing I DON"T like though is that I have heard that you die a lot and that it is part of the game…and then you have to start over from the beginning. So you should expect to die and expect to have to repeat areas (though much more quickly the second time). Can anyone confirm or deny this? If it is true, is it annoying?

More areas open up to you as you level up and your rank goes up. So say you go through several areas with ‘doors’ that will not open for you at that rank which is raised through fighting and party experience. Say you die. You retain your higher rank, and some of those doors that expand upon the areas will open to you. That’s sorta how it works from what I understand. Dying isn’t all that bad.

I think it’s been said best by a few others, in order to enjoy BoFV, you’ll have top stop thinking in the usual terms and conditions the generic but popular rpgs offer currently.

Hell, MAF’s a total hater, so I might as well be a troll. You can take that all the way to GA, MAF.

Regarding Xenosaga’s story, from what I’ve seen, it has its really good moments, but it also hits some bum notes, and yeah–there’s no doubt it could have been edited down. Some of the sci-fi is good, and some of it consists of characters shouting dumb acronymns at each other while warning sirens are going off. It’s all very anime, but with lots of Philip K. Dick influence.

I’m enjoying it, but I also liked the stories in Final Fantasy VII and Metal Gear Solid 2, which are much maligned here, so take what I’m saying with a grain of salt if you weren’t already doing so.

<very minor spoiler warning>

In particular, one of the main characters, Ziggurat 8 (who is later re-Christened Ziggy) is one of the best RPG characters I’ve run across in a while. While I’m on the Blade Runner tip, I feel like maybe he was modeled after Rutger Hauer’s character in that movie. He’s an old-fashioned cyborg who’s also a highly accomplished mercenary, and he uses his reward money towards replacing all of his remaining human parts so that he can be deemed legally dead. It’s like a reverse-Robocop thing, a man who seems to be so weirdly melancholy or even suicidal that he just wants to let go of all his remaining humanity. But then he meets a young Realian girl (basically they’re replicants–manufactured humans) and quickly becomes sort of a father figure to her, and you get the impression that he’s found his new lease on life… or maybe not. Anyway, I guess you could say it’s hokey, but the guy’s voice is perfect for him and the character is established very well, and you (or at least I) really want to know what ends up happening to him.

Im not a hater, you’re just paranoid.

Hey, you coined the expression “KasavinSpot,” not me. I can’t help it if there’s so many damn games what need reviewing all the time.

You must have me confused with another MrAngryFace. I love reading Gamespot. Im glad you review everything because differing viewpoints always confuses me. Who am I to believe. I believe you sir, because you are truly the pinnacle of gaming journalism.

I may be confused. Are you and this reviewer saying a total of 45 minutes throughout the game or one 45 min. long cut scene? I readd his review as it contains several cut scenes and one as long as 45 mins. I know my conception of time while gaming is altered, but I cannot ever remember wading through 45 solid minutes.

I have noticed the conspicuous absence of any mention of .hack. IGN gave it an editor’s choice review, but the others have been fairly like warm. It sounds like an incredibly interesting concept, but one that seems to have ample chances to fall on its face.