Buying Alcohol Online

I’m about to move to a part of the country where I don’t expect to find phenomenal liquor stores. This coupled with my like of liquors that are a bit harder to find (primarily because I don’t drink enough to drink the traditional cheap, grocery store type of crap) has me looking for stores that sell wide varieties of better liquor online and can ship to a variety of places. Beverages and More in CA satisfies the first criteria, but can’t ship out of state. I know there are all sorts of legal issues, so maybe I’m just screwed, but I was hoping someone here was in a similar situation and had scoped out a few choice stores.

At the moment, I’m particularly looking for a store that sells Gozio Amaretto, which I’m using as my benchmark for how good their selection really is.

Any suggestions?

If they don’t have phenomenal liquor stores, then why move there?

It’s hottie per capita rating is second only to Poland?

Because I like continuing to get paid to do the work I enjoy. And the mountain view is spectacular.

Liquor is importable; mountains as it turns out are not.

Be careful about that assumption. Look at some on-line retailers like KL Wines and Mission Liquour and see if your state is in the list of ‘approved’ states. A lot of states do not allow the retail importation of alcohol under the pretense they can’t check id, but in fact it’s because of A.) liquor distributor/wholesaler special interests and B.) inability to charge an alcohol tax.

Be careful about that assumption. Look at some on-line retailers like KL Wines and Mission Liquour and see if your state is in the list of ‘approved’ states. A lot of states do not allow the retail importation of alcohol under the pretense they can’t check id, but in fact it’s because of A.) liquor distributor/wholesaler special interests and B.) inability to charge an alcohol tax.[/quote]

Well, it’s importable in the sense that I can at least bring a bottle with me when I drive across state lines. ;) Strapping a mountain to my little dinky SUV isn’t likely to work. But I’m aware of this potential pitfall, especially given my choice of locale (UT).

Hmmm… a bit of research indicates I’m totally and utterly screwed. Ah well, it’s not permanent. When I stop in Denver I’ll try to stock up on the things I care about.

What was that movie where the college students from Utah or wherever had to drive across statelines to get beer, to a small provincial town where they convinced the people in the store that they were demonically posessed for laughs?

‘S.L.C Punk’ (Salt Lake City). The horrors of growing up punk in Utah in the mid-80s. To my surprise, a pretty good flick.

I’m pretty sure the USSC recently decided that was unconstitutional, but I’m just going off hazy memory here.

And you should have no problems.

Some of the stores in this area carry a very impressive selection.

If you have a couple of favorites, getting in good with a local liquor store manager might convince the store to start carrying a wider selection, or at least some of your favorites.

Heh. Problem is I’ll be living in Utah where the only liquor stores are state run.

Think it’s easier to get in good with friends/family and ask them to ship me stuff on occasion.

Utah? Fuck that shit. You cant even get real beer in Utah.

I’d love it if that were the case, but I haven’t seen any major changes yet in policy.

Here’s one link on the topic.

EDIT: Updated to a more up to date link on the SC decision

You’re going to be screwed alcohol wise living in Utah. Can’t have a keg without a liquor license, state run liquor stores only, and the bars can only put so much alcohol in each drink (and have special mechanical contraption they put on bottles to make sure you don’t go over the limit).

BTW, the quick summary of what I can find about liquor importation laws had to do with out-of-state wine sales direct to consumers. The Supreme Court basically told states that they couldn’t be hypocritical about it – either you allow import ANd export of wine from your state, or you allow neither. You can’t allow export but allow import.

So for those of us that are routinely screwed at the local liquor stores, particularly for fine scotches cough, we’re still SOL except in states that are somewhat enlightened about this stuff.

Since I live in gun-toting, Bush-voting, church-going, Sherman-hating Atlanta, GA, I’m screwed.

[quote=“Guido_Jones”]

You’re going to be screwed alcohol wise living in Utah. Can’t have a keg without a liquor license, state run liquor stores only, and the bars can only put so much alcohol in each drink (and have special mechanical contraption they put on bottles to make sure you don’t go over the limit).[/quote]

I’m far more concerned with quality than quantity. The problem isn’t having kegs or limited pours at bars (I’ve paid for drinks in bars few enough times I can probably count them on my fingers and toes.) It’s more the state-run store with their mediocre selection of utter crap and partial crap brands that’s going to frustrate me. I drink infrequently enough that when I do drink, I want to enjoy the good stuff. Which means all the brands that you see in the grocery stores as “expensive” are more or less a last ditch minimum for me. Luckily I have family in denver which is weekend-able if it gets that bad. (Although the extra “gas tax” that will add on to the price of the liquor will suck.)

I did find one online retailer who only lists difficulty shipping to MD. I don’t know if this is because they can’t imagine anyone from Utah ordering through them, or because they can actually ship to Utah. Seeing as I can’t ship from CA to UT, it seems a bit iffy.

Good link, thanks. Although I think the issue is not import vs export, but rather intrastate vs interstate shipping. In other words, if Utah allows Utah distilleries to ship whiskey directly to consumers, Utah would also have to allow out-of-state distilleries to ship directly to consumers. But you’re right that that isn’t helpful if Utah (or Georgia) simply prohibits all mail-order whiskey. You’d still be screwed. (Also, I think you’re right that an import vs export scheme would also be unconstitutional–I just don’t think that’s the situation that was addressed in the wine case.)

I’ll trust you on that front, I’m not a lawyer and I didn’t actually read the whole article. In the spirit of the Internet, I skimmed only enough to sound like an authority on the subject. =)