Chaos in the Old World!

Blood For The Blood God!!!

We have at least two threads about the new edition of Space Hulk, and none for this superb game? For shame.

So I picked this up from my local game store last week, when I grabbed my pre-ordered copy of Space Hulk. At this point (having played it three times), I’m going to call it out as my favorite new boardgame of the year, and probably the best game FFG has ever published.

As a review up on the 'geek noted, the closest thing to compare it to is Avalon Hill/EON’s old Dune boardgame, and it pretty much equals or surpasses it in almost every way (the only thing it can’t compare to is formal alliances- completely absent from CitOW), which in my book is high praise indeed. It’s a near-perfect blend of abstract Euro-style mechanics (limited action points, area control/scoring, VPs) and American-style hugely-realized-theme, direct player interaction and dice rolling.

I really can’t praise it highly enough. Has anyone else here played it?

Have it, haven’t played it yet, hopefully this weekend. I’ll get back to you if so:)

I was really interested until I saw that it requires 4 players. No more, no less. I almost never have more than 3, so I had to take a pass.

This review cracks me up.

http://vimeo.com/6323690

At first glance the game gives me a Warhammer El Grande vibe. The comparison to Dune is mighty powerful.

EDIT: I take the El Grande comparison back. The 4 different flavors of playing/winning is a giant step beyond El Grande.

Great review.

Not true, the game plays with three players. Here’s some opinions about three player play. I intend to play it with three players on Saturday.

Your information is erroneous. While I haven’t personally played with three, it was designed with either three or four in mind, and word on the 'geek is that three works just fine.

All I know is what I saw on the box. 4 Players, not “3-4”.

The box clearly has the 3-4 players symbol. I just checked.

Hmm… Ok… My mistake. I could have sworn it said ‘4’ when I looked at GenCon. In any case, this doesn’t help me a whole lot since often I only have 2.

I have been yelling “Blood for the Blood God!” around the house the past two days or inserting it into normal sentences - i.e. “So, what do we need at the store: milk, eggs, Blood for the Blood God.” I’m trying to freak out my wife. It’s working.

I would really love this game, but we rarely have 3 players, let alone 4. I think I’m going to get Space Hulk instead, which is a shame, because Chaos in the Old World really has that good old fashioned evil draw within a Eurogame style mechanic and something like El Grande with plague dripping Nergalites.

BTW, how do Slaanesh, Tz…ugh… eithct or whatever, and Nergal go up the special wheels?

SoM

just ordered from Amazon…should have it by Tuesday…so looking forward to this game.

Chris

Excellent game- different sides, different win conditions, a set time limit on play (the Old World deck) keeping the game time a trim 1.5 hours, easy rules to learn…absolutely superb. Two plays so far, with four players each time. Can’t wait to play more!!

Be sure to check out the errata, though- FFG misprinted Slaanesh’s dial advancement condition. It should be one tick for each region with a hero or noble wherein you place two corruption.

Are you in the UK? In the US Amazon is showing available in 1-3 weeks.

Still ordered it, though.

Oh, and to answer the question about dial advancement:

Khorne: One counter for every time you kill 1 or more units in a region. Regions can only give one counter each- i.e. if you slaughter 5 units in one big battle you don’t get five counters! This encourages Khorne to wreack havoc far and wide.

Nurgle: One counter for every “populous” region in which you placed two or more corruption counters during the corruption phase. Nurgle will therefore naturally gravitate towards the more high VP regions.

Tzeentch: One counter for each region containing a combination of two warpstone pieces/magic symbols in which you placed two or more corruption tokens during the corruption phase. This makes Tzeentch pretty unpredictable- they will naturally gravitate around warpstone, but the ability to also go where there are magic symbols can open up new avenues and opportunites.

Slaanesh: One counter for each region containing at least one noble or hero in which you placed two or more corruption counters during the corruptions phase. Slaanesh goes where the nobles go- or he brings them to him! Tends to skulk around the edges.

After enjoying Space Hulk to a ridiculous extent, I’ve ordered this and am considering finding a copy of the Doom board game as well…

So now that someone posted this, I’ll post a few obeservations from my (admittedly few) games:

Khorne: One counter for every time you kill 1 or more units in a region. Regions can only give one counter each- i.e. if you slaughter 5 units in one big battle you don’t get five counters! This encourages Khorne to wreack havoc far and wide.

In four player games, it’s up to Khorne to keep things interesting, because he can pretty much only win through dial advancement (with only four cultists, he pretty much never gets victory points). He has to attack everyone to keep them in check, but he has to know who to attack at just the right time. Early in the game, that seems to be Slannesh- he absolutely cannot let the Slannesh player get two dial advancements in the first few turns. But he has to keep Nurgle from constant domination, and Tzeencth from doing whatever it is he’s doing. Everyone initially seems to think that Khorne would be the easiest and most straightforward (just kill everyone!), but he seems to require a pretty precise sense of timing.

Nurgle: One counter for every “populous” region in which you placed two or more corruption counters during the corruption phase. Nurgle will therefore naturally gravitate towards the more high VP regions.

This one is weird. It’s pretty much impossible for Nurgle to win through dial advancements- he needs 11, which in a standard game means he needs to win the second tick at least half the turns- and considering that to do that he needs to take the most hotly contested regions to get his ticks… it just ain’t gonna happen. Which isn’t to say that he shouldn’t try, because dominating/ruining those regions gives him the VPs he needs to win. This is perhaps my only problem with the game- two powers (Nurgle and to a lesser extent Tzeentch) are really looking for VP wins most of the time. But the VP win is inferior to the dial win- by the rules, if the two players meet the win conditions on the same turn, the one who did the dial wins. This bothers me- it just sets up two players as inferior from the getgo. Not a big deal, but not ideal, either.

Tzeentch: One counter for each region containing a combination of two warpstone pieces/magic symbols in which you placed two or more corruption tokens during the corruption phase. This makes Tzeentch pretty unpredictable- they will naturally gravitate around warpstone, but the ability to also go where there are magic symbols can open up new avenues and opportunites.

This is so true. He’s absurdly flexible, but this means he’s not really targeted at any particular win condition- he’d better choose one at the beginning and stick to it. The neatest strategy I saw for Tzeentch was the other night, when the player playing him tried for a strategy of getting the acolyte upgrade first, then getting all the warpstone in one place and just ruining it. Didn’t work in the end, but that’s only because Khorne (me) eked out a dial victory right in front of him (see above note)

Slaanesh: One counter for each region containing at least one noble or hero in which you placed two or more corruption counters during the corruptions phase. Slaanesh goes where the nobles go- or he brings them to him! Tends to skulk around the edges.

And finally the pleasure god. His biggest strength (low dial ticks to get to victory- only 7!), is also his greatest weakness. I’d say he’s just as good at getting VPs as the rest of them (except Khorne, of course), but his short dial means he’d be stupid to try for anything else. The problem is, with only two nobles on the board at the beginning, and only a rare chance for more from the Old World deck, it is painfully obvious to everyone (especially his nemesis Khorne) where he’s targeting.

Of course, the beauty and replayability of the game comes from the hand of cards you’ve got, the Old World random encounter deck and the initial spread of counters on the board. The cat-and-mouse of the action phase going around the table is great, everyone taking their actions one at a time, screaming bloody murder when they misjudge and get shut out of playing a card in a crucial location- it’s just awesome. The temporary alliances and backstabbing. It all just comes together so well.

I didn’t buy it from Amazon, I bought it through Amazon. There was someone (A1Books, I think they are) that has (had?) it for 42 dollars, in stock and ready to ship.

Here is the link: http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/1589946510/ref=sr_1_olp_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1253321056&sr=8-1

I ordered a copy of this on Wednesday, so am excited to play it for pretty much all the reasons described above.

(Also, the same reasons why I’m excited about Sol Infernum)

KG

Skip the Doom game. It pales in comparison to Space Hulk.