Civ 4: How to Make Friends and Influence People

Any advice on playing the diplomat in Civ 4? I’ve gotten allies up to a giant laundry list of positives but it seems like there is very little you can do beyond a certain point to make friends. Giving away effectively infinite gold seems to only get you the +4 “good trades” bonus. Meanwhile it seems almost impossible to overcome the “you are trading with our enemies” penalty that comes along with trying to be friendly to the world.

Any advice on making friends? A diplomatic victory seems nearly impossible to me…

I’m having this problem, too.

I can get about five people to be “pleased” with me, but it’s really hard to get “friendly.” There are always a couple who hate you, for being so nice to their enemies.

I tried to get the UN victory, and my mighty nation was big enough, with enough votes, that all I needed was the vote from one of the next three biggest leaders. But they would always abstain.

I’m guessing the way to win the UN vote might be to actually have a couple more enemies, and be more selective about your friends. Go ahead and be REAL good friends with the next 1 or 2 biggest empires, to the point that you go to war with them and really piss off some of the others. Who cares if those don’t vote for you? All you need is the votes of one or two other large countries.

Maybe. I haven’t been able to try that theory to fruition yet. I’d like to think there’s a better way to win a “be nice to everyone” victory. Because ironically, the best way to win a diplomat’s victory seems to be to go for the culture win (three cities over 50K culture), which I’ve done.

Choose your friends selectively, and hope they never become enemies with one another. Basically, try to form a game-lasting bloc, and make sure the bloc becomes big enough to give you the UN vote.

Play a custom game and turn on “Permament alliances” – then you can research an option to request a perm alliance (I beleive Communism and some other tech combined give it)

Getting the Perm Alliance isn’t bleeding easy. You have to get friendly, then maintain a defencive pact for what seems like an eternity before you can suggest the PA.

Once the PA goes through, though, you share research 100% and the AI will, literally, call you up all the time to give you some money, resources, or whatever. It’s like having a highschool girlfriend.

Seems like you could go for a “we are the world” style diplomatic victory by getting PA’s with everyone, though each successive alliance will probably be progressively harder.

Finally, to play the Diplomat you CAN’T be Sweeden. (Notice: Sweeden doesn’t have any real enemies, but they don’t really have any friends either.) Pick a faction (I try to aim for two civs that are already happy with eachother then shoehorn in it to ensure I have at least 2 allies.) and stick with them. If they go to war, you go to war. If they don’t like India, you don’t like India. Often, you get into World Wars if you play this way, where two opposing civs get into a tit and then the rest of the world follows suit. It’s really facinating.

Chris Woods

I’ve done a cultural victory and a space victory so far. I’m thinking I’m going for the land mass/population victory in my next game. I’ve noticed that the score in the lower right is also mostly biased toward land/people, as I was very clearly ahead in tech and production in one game, and actually building a spaceship, yet was still second place.

First off, it’s Sweden. Secondly, Sweden was about as much in bed with NATO as was possible while keeping its population in the dark about it. Made it a bit difficult for the leaders of the opposition party during the quite intense foreign policy debates, since they knew about the arrangement, and their public position was pretty much such a deal with NATO, while the governing Social Democrats publically argued against such a deal, after having made it.

Yeah, I’m not sure what’s going with that. In a big SP game I’m playing, the fourth-place player is actually my closest rival in terms of going for the win. He has like 4 cities, and he’s busy cranking out wonders, the UN, and spaceships parts. I’d smack him, but he’s too far away. This is what convinced me that I probably shouldn’t completely blow off the diplomacy angle of the game.

I’m finding out that I probably should have stayed with a few allies and been more receptive to their requests to cancel trade with enemies and join in common wars. That said, I wish there were a way to view the full diplomacy (ally/enemy) report when contacted by a leader. I’ve ended up with a few negative points in the “declaring war on our friends” category that could have otherwise been avoided.

  • Alan

First off, it’s Sweden. Secondly, Sweden was about as much in bed with NATO as was possible while keeping its population in the dark about it. Made it a bit difficult for the leaders of the opposition party during the quite intense foreign policy debates, since they knew about the arrangement, and their public position was pretty much such a deal with NATO, while the governing Social Democrats publically argued against such a deal, after having made it.[/quote]

Guessing he meant Switzerland, heh.

First off, it’s Sweden. Secondly, Sweden was about as much in bed with NATO as was possible while keeping its population in the dark about it. Made it a bit difficult for the leaders of the opposition party during the quite intense foreign policy debates, since they knew about the arrangement, and their public position was pretty much such a deal with NATO, while the governing Social Democrats publically argued against such a deal, after having made it.[/quote]

Guessing he meant Switzerland, heh.[/quote]

VENDETTA ON BOTH OF YOU!

Chris Woods

Yeah, the little spiderweb of colored lines in Civ III wasn’t ideal, but it’s better than having to ask “What do you think about _______?” over and over (and then try to remember the answers).

Yeah, the little spiderweb of colored lines in Civ III wasn’t ideal, but it’s better than having to ask “What do you think about _______?” over and over (and then try to remember the answers).[/quote]

Hit F4. Allows you to see the relationships between any one leader and all other countries. Even Sweeden.

Chris Woods

That page doesn’t really show you whether or not they like someone. It shows open borders, and wars, and defensive pacts, but not the level of like/dislike. Unless I’m missing something.

[quote=“Jason_Cross”]

That page doesn’t really show you whether or not they like someone. It shows open borders, and wars, and defensive pacts, but not the level of like/dislike. Unless I’m missing something.[/quote]

If you select just one leader, the attitudes will change to show what everyone else thinks of that leader… (and if you mouse-over, you can get details…)

It appears to me as if sharing a common religion can be a big deal too, when playing the diplomatic game. In the games I’ve played so far, it has been much easier to create and maintain positive relationships with civs that share my civ’s religion. And am I right in thinking that positive attitude modifiers go up over time? If so, then forging positive relationships early seems important.

Re: permanent alliances, so that’s how they work? I need to turn on the option before starting a game? Looks like I need to RTFM.

That page doesn’t really show you whether or not they like someone. It shows open borders, and wars, and defensive pacts, but not the level of like/dislike. Unless I’m missing something.[/quote]

If you select just one leader, the attitudes will change to show what everyone else thinks of that leader… (and if you mouse-over, you can get details…)[/quote]
But this doesn’t work WHILE in the diplomacy screen, so there’s no way to know whether you’re going to get a -1 “You traded with our enemies!” tag from someone you’re trying to butter up.