Collectible Card Game for kids

My buddies and I dusted off our old Magic cards last week and played a 4+ hour game with much swilling of beer, eating of chips, and talking of smack. Good fun!

And now my 9-year old wants to play and I’m sure he’d love it as long as I’m there to moderate but it’s probably too complex for he and his friends to play on their own.

He and most of his buddies have collected Pokemon for years but have never played a game by the “real” rules, but I’m not so sure if Pokemon is “cool” enough anymore to get into it now.

Which is why I’m thinking of Yu Gi Oh. How’s that for 9-10 year olds? And if it’s an option, is there a 2-player starter kit?

thx

My 12 year old niece has been into Yu Gi Oh for at least a year, so I’d bet a smart 9-10 year would probably get it as well. I’m pretty sure I’ve seen starter sets for it as well.

But if he and his friends have already been collecting Pokemon for years, wouldn’t that be a significantly better route? No further investment in cardboard, they’d just need to learn the real rules.

Yu gi oh would be the obvious choice indeed. A smart 9-10 year old should be able to play Magic however… god knows there are enough kids around that age (well, maybe 10-13) who play it at booster drafts every Friday at this card store in L.A…

9-10 and playing magic doesn’t seem at all out of the ordinary. I’d suggest that you pick up maybe some of the core set starter packs for the new rules/simplified mechanics, rather than whatever the current block is, but I don’t think just letting them have at magic is a bad idea. Especially since it’s something you and he could then have in common.

If you’re playing magic circa 6+ years ago with your undusted cards, the rules have been streamlined a lot since then, and the new sets are significantly less nitpicky since they removed interrupts and complex stack mechanics.

Screw Magic, screw Yu Gi Oh. Get that kid some Pirates of the Spanish Main. More spacial thinking and strategy involved, and the construction element shoudl spark their imagination. See also Rocketmen.

http://www.wizkidsgames.com/wk_home.asp

Yea. The 9th edition cards are pretty simple, and have reminder text for all the abilities (land walk, trample, protection from colours, etc).

Also echoing mouselock, it’s probably safer not to get the new set (Ravnica), as that’s pretty advanced, and adds a whole slew of mechanics that just complicate things.

I agree Magic is a bitch to teach people, but once they understand all the rules to a decent degree (I still don’t know everything about it), it’s very enjoyable.

Ok, so the new “Advanced” and “Expert” designations I’m seeing on the new cards is to be avoided? The 9E core set is just basic, old school rules? I think he can handle that and that would let me use all my old cards to get him started.

If you’re playing magic circa 6+ years ago with your undusted cards, the rules have been streamlined a lot since then, and the new sets are significantly less nitpicky since they removed interrupts and complex stack mechanics.

Hmm, you mean the 9th Edition core? Yeah, I downloaded the rulebook and it definitely seems more organized (eg the new Stack mechanic) but it doesn’t seem like interrupts were removed… Maybe I just don’t remember but we always played LIFO rules, just like the new stack thing, but we didn’t actually stack anything. Are interrupts completely removed in 9E?

Yea. The 9th edition cards are pretty simple, and have reminder text for all the abilities (land walk, trample, protection from colours, etc).
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Yeah, we noticed that the new cards (we actually played with new theme decks and left our old cards out of it) dropped the helpful rules written right on the card. We had to consult the Intarweb a few times to figure out what some of the new abilities did (ie double strike, haste, etc).

Wizards also produces Duel Masters, which is kind of like a streamlined Magic. I like the rules, though I haven’t been keeping track of how the expansions change the game.

Shadowfist. The rules are cleaner than magic, and IMHO the game is far more exciting (and balanced), especially for multiplayer games where magic really drags. The Kung Fu/Hong Kong action/Time Travel setting is also much cooler and funnier.

However you go, I suspect a 9 year old kid could handle magic no sweat if you played it a few times with him, or any kid old enough to read the cards really.

Interrupts have been gone for a while now, actually. But I don’t get the feeling you’re thinking about interrupts when you’re recollecting. Interrupts were things like Red Elemental Blast which could do odd things like remove a spell or creature so fast that their damage never got assigned (essentially). Now there’s just one LIFO stack, and barring a few odd examples (counterspell type effects, which have begun to go away to large extent anyway), once an effect is on the stack it remains there, regardless of something else interacting with the effect generator.

There used to be some esoteric ways that you could cause effects to basically remove themselves from the stack. The primary example I can think of is that blocking creatures which got tapped during damage resolution at the right time would not contribute blocking damage. That seems to be gone now. (In fact, I believe tapped blocking creatures now contribute combat damage no matter what.)

The 9th Core Rules are very good about just having the most basic concepts in the game, so it’s a lot more accessible. Once those rules are second hand, you can move on to the block constructed decks to get a flavor of the block mechanics.

Interrupts have been gone for a while now, actually. But I don’t get the feeling you’re thinking about interrupts when you’re recollecting. Interrupts were things like Red Elemental Blast which could do odd things like remove a spell or creature so fast that their damage never got assigned (essentially). Now there’s just one LIFO stack, and barring a few odd examples (counterspell type effects, which have begun to go away to large extent anyway), once an effect is on the stack it remains there, regardless of something else interacting with the effect generator.

There used to be some esoteric ways that you could cause effects to basically remove themselves from the stack. The primary example I can think of is that blocking creatures which got tapped during damage resolution at the right time would not contribute blocking damage. That seems to be gone now. (In fact, I believe tapped blocking creatures now contribute combat damage no matter what.)

The 9th Core Rules are very good about just having the most basic concepts in the game, so it’s a lot more accessible. Once those rules are second hand, you can move on to the block constructed decks to get a flavor of the block mechanics.[/quote]

Ahh, yes, I do recall that odd tapped blocker rule where they don’t deal damage if they get tapped.

What are these new “blocks”? Is it merely an “expansion set”?

Anyway, looks like I’m going to pick up the 9th Edition Core Fat Pack for my son for xmas. That ought to get him started on his way to addiction and the poor house quite nicely. :roll:

Kinda… right about Mirage or so (I think) WotC started moving to a standardized way of producing expansions: One large “starter set” and two follow up expansions. (Think Ice Age was the first of the “big sets”, and Alliances would have been one of the expansions for it.)

So basically a block is a year’s worth of expansion. These days they’re thematically linked in mechanism and setting. Ravnica, for example, is the current new block set with the whole base setup, and there will be two more expansions for it over the course of the next 10 months or so completing the Ravnica block. At any given time the Type 2 tournament cards are the most recent core set plus the two most recent blocks (barring an odd blip here or there; for example a long-lost ice-age expansion is scheduled to come out on it’s own odd schedule in the next half a year I believe).

It’s far more structured than it was back in the days of Arabian Knights and Legends and such.

mouselock, thanks for the help. It certainly seems like a good time to start playing Magic again what with all the latest advances towards organization and simplification. Where do the old cards fit into all of this? I’ve got loads of Fallen Empires, Ice Age, (4th?) edition, etc.

Nathan, I took a peek at Duel Masters and it looks right up my kid’s alley. It’s sort of a cross of Magic + Pokemon. Hmm, decisions…

They look pretty? Some of them have rotated into the base set, but basically the tournament scene these days is dominated by Type 2, which is the two current blocks + current core set. If you enjoy playing with the old stuff, have at, but most folks don’t really have a ton of interest in old sets wholesale. The entire game seems more “min/max” oriented outside of friendly home play, although that may just be the sources of information I peruse.

Guh, again I advocate Pirates or Rocketmen. I do this because there are about $3,000 worth of rotting Magic cards sit in my storage locker as I write this. I loved Magic back in the day, but boy oh boy, did it destroy my bank account.

Incidentally, if anyone’s interested, I rekindled my addiction two years ago to write this piece: http://www.eastbayexpress.com/issues/2004-02-04/news/feature.html on a dude trying to go pro in Magic. Looooooooooong story, but certainly nerdy.

Is WotC still printing the Harry Potter CCG?

  • Alan

Went to Target to take stock of their TCG support and they have absolutely no Duel Masters cards. Nada. The place is completely overrun with Yu Gi Oh! They did have a decent selection of current Pokemon stuff.

Alex, thanks for the link. Gonna check it out.

I would consider simply letting him play the “money” collectible card game, wherein each week he takes a $20 bill, compares the serial number with one supplied by a game shop vendor, and if his serial number is lower than the game shop vendor’s, he simply gives him the $20. If he has a high number than the game shop vendor, it’s a push, and he comes back next week for more.

This is likely to be cheaper and ultimately more satisfying than a CCG. :)