Congrats to SWG

275,000 registered accounts. That’s impressive. They might pass EQ. I had no idea the game was doing that well. I thought it was going to stall in the 150,000-200,000 mark.

Just think how well the game might do if it had vehicles and more interesting combat!

Combat is more interesting than in any other MMORPG I’ve played.

It’s doing really well – it’s been in the top 3 best-selling games of the month for a couple of months. I don’t think any other MMORPG even hit the top 10 for sequential months.

Yeah, but are there any jedi yet?

I don’t see what makes SWG comabt any more interesting than any of the others. It was the same stuff from my experience.

It is a great game… I am hooked and I havent even reached BountyHunter yet… I am happy to pay $15/month for this game.

Far better than any MMORPG I have played to date, even better than my beloved DAoC.

As for Jedi, no there are no Jedi’s yet. There are no spaceships or vehicles yet, nor any player cities, nor any mounts… yet this game is still so great. I can’t imagine how many subscribers there will be when all of this does come into play in the next year or so.

It’s a great game whether you are a SW fan or not (I am not). I suggest you pick it up! (Most of the big bugs have been squashed right now…)

So… it’s more of just “Galaxies: Empire Divided”.

Jason, I don’t want to sound like a SWG fan boi… sure, the game still has it problems… but I think that combat is one of the most interactive in this game than others… especially ranged combat.

What “level” is your character and what classes have you experimented with so far?

What I find impressive is the amount of people that are playing it IN SPITE of all that’s missing! Fanboyism at it’s best. (Worst?)

This might just be me being too cynical, but did anyone else find the word registered a little off in this press release?

eg:

An Empire Divided has quickly become the second largest MMO in the U.S., in terms of registered users, and is the fastest growing MMO role-playing game (RPG) to date.

…like the might be including people who bought the game, and then cancelled after their free month?

Yeah, that’s an odd distinction to make…

Also it doesn’t account for players with multiple accounts. I still don’t think its doing as well as they planned. But who knows, a quarter million sold, multiple or not… thats still alot.

etc

Wait a minute? The combat is interesting? I thought it just played itself…trading licks on each other, so to speak. And every now and then you threw in a skill to help beat things. Isn’t that just like EQ and DAOC?

Robert Sharp,

it doesn’t “play by iteself” entirely… if you want to optimize the DMG being done then you have to remain interactive (ie. all ranged weapons have optimal distances within their range, and most mobs move while fighting)… also, different combat tactics employed during fighting lead to different XP gains in different skills… hence my scout is trapping a lot more, when last month all I did was just ranged weapons… I am learning as I go along… and the more you learn/play the more “interactive” the combat becomes.

I can only imagine how many copies it’d sell if there was a real game in the box.

In addition to the variety of handy special attacks just the nuts and bolts of basic combat has some flexibility. Each creature has essentially three pools of ‘hitpoints’, body, action and mind. Each main category of ranged weapon (with its attendant special attacks) tends to focus on one of these. Someone that can only use pistols (with the exception of some high level specialized attacks) is mainly going to effect the health bar of his target. My character is a master marksman. He carries two pistols (one that does energy damage and one that does heat damage), a carbine (mainly for the autofire attack that does big generic damage but that can also stun or blind a target), and two rifles (one which does large amounts of energy damage and a second that does less damage but uses heat and is armor piercing).

His tactics vary a great deal depending on his role in a group or the target he’s taking on. As a squad leader he’ll do few special attacks and mainly focus on coordinating his group and using squad leader abilities - his weapon then will be the one which costs him the least amount of pool for special attacks because he’ll be spending pool points on SL functions - what special attacks he uses will often be ones to divert, spook or suppress a target while his teammates do the killing. When hunting pack critters solo he’ll be using one of his pistols as they tend to be more effective at close range. Going after a big beast he’ll likely use a longer range weapon from a prone position after taking cover - and use bleeding attacks. If the beast charges he’ll try to spook it off with threaten or warning shots. Failing that, he’s also a smuggler, he’ll play dead while the beastie bleeds to death. But of course he has to survive a hit for that to work.

And I’m nowhere near an expert. These are just tactics I’ve picked up which have come in handy.

Exactly. While you still don’t have to “aim”, or have any twitch-based skills, combat in SWG is far more involved, and interesting, than in any MMORPG I’ve played:

  • Abilities that can significantly impact combat - using warning shots to scare off monsters that get too close, or multiple creatures; using masked scent to get close to them and hide your location, using shots to knock charging monsters down, or make them dizzy and more likely to fall down; you can use the cover skill to both hide and be more effective. The use of those skills can be quite tactical, and context specific, and not just result in “more damage” if you happen to hit the right combination of special attacks as in DaoC, for instance. And certainly not just sitting there with the attack button on, as in EQ.

  • There’s obviously “kiting” - attacking and running away while continuing to fire with ranged weapons. You can use terrain to make this significantly more effective;

  • You can aim for any of the three different attribute pools that can take out an opponent, and you can study creatures to learn which types of damage they are most vulnerable to, and then buy or acquire weaponry that works particularly well against those creatures (and use special attacks that effect their weakest attributes);

  • You can use different types of traps, and combine their effects. You can also use the assistance of creatures, or faction followers like stormtroopers. Different creatures are hostile to each other as well, so you can lure your attackers into areas where you’ll get support from other monsters or NPCs;

  • You can use positioning (prone/crouch/standing); you can alternate the type of weapon you use at different distances, since different ones have different “sweet spot” ranges. You also constantly use your special attacks (to the point where you essentially are never just sitting there after hitting the attack button).

Unlike in every other MMORPG I’ve ever played, I never get the feeling that I’m not having an effect on the outcome – there’s a very,very great difference between the types of creatures you can take out using auto-attack and the types of creatures you can take out with better planning.

While in other MMORPGs, you might be able to kill a creature that’s the same level or slightly higher than you, if you happen to use special attacks at the right time (if the game offers them) – in SWG you could easily lose to even a creature weaker than yourself if you’re dumb about it (like letting a melee fighter get the jump on you), while you can take essentially take out creatures far above your level that could kill you with a swat or two if you let 'em.

SWG is not as accessible as it should be – and I think a lot of players get in, try a couple lamo mission terminal quests and think there’s nothing to the combat (other than “it’s hard”). But there’s a lot of depth and substance, and far more opportunity than in other MMORPGs to actually influence the outcome with skill, as opposed to the ridiculous “level-based” combat systems of games like EQ and DaoC. After SWG, I can’t imagine ever being satisfied with that type of system (well, I actually never really was).

Yep, SWG is as bad a game as Morrowind and Jagged Alliance 2!

Eat me. :D

The SWG assessment appears to be:

  1. It’s slightly more complicated than the other MMORPGs out there.
  2. It’s completely broken in tons of ways.

By MMORPG standards, I guess it’s a triumph, but “does the chat client work” is the MMORPG standard.

Exactly. While you still don’t have to “aim”, or have any twitch-based skills, combat in SWG is far more involved, and interesting, than in any MMORPG I’ve played:

  • Abilities that can significantly impact combat - using warning shots to scare off monsters that get too close, or multiple creatures; using masked scent to get close to them and hide your location, using shots to knock charging monsters down, or make them dizzy and more likely to fall down; you can use the cover skill to both hide and be more effective. The use of those skills can be quite tactical, and context specific, and not just result in “more damage” if you happen to hit the right combination of special attacks as in DaoC, for instance. And certainly not just sitting there with the attack button on, as in EQ.
    [/quote]

Let me do the DAoC translation here:

warning shots = Mez or other crowd control
masked scent = stealth
knock down = stun
cover = stealth
other stuff is like the reactionary attacks in DAOC that could stun, slow, do more damage and had to be executed off of blocks, parries, from various directions, from stealth and as follow ups.

I had one character in DAoC that could do all of those things plus confuse, move two times the speed of normal characters, add hitpoints to an entire party, and charm monsters.

There is really nothing new in SWG.

Xplay did the most accurate review of it yet. 2 out of 5 and the best comment was it is an MMORPG with some Star Wars juice sprayed on it.

– Xaroc

That assessment is completely wrong…it’s pretty solid (although lacking some of the initially promised content).

Even the initial release wasn’t broken in tons of ways – the only real issues were that (a) the interface would occasionally get quirky when it was first released, all in minor ways (such as waypoints not being properly erased if you’d played the game for a while, or inventory not showing correct volume numbers); (b) some elite skill tracks, like Droid engineer, didn’t work properly, and others, like Creature Handler, gave characters without those skills experience points; and (c) some of the random NPC quests were bugged (in part because of the interface problems, identified above, where waypoints would be…wayward).

Those are all problems that should have been fixed prior to the game’s release, but they’re already repaired – the game was never “completely broken in tons of ways”, and it certainly ain’t now.

And I could care less about chat clients (for all I know, that’s broken).