Cyberpunk 2077 - CDProjekt's New Joint

But is it up the standards of a Star Citizen roadmap to a roadmap, hmm?

Heh… when NMS released, it was an absolute clusterfuck.

Ah. Here it is. Finally.

41 min, I am gonna need popcorn.

Took a little over 4 minutes to get to, “You done fucked it up!”.

Just started…3 hours in. Running on a new 3080 and a 48" LG OLED. No bugs or other weirdness.

It is honestly incredible. Easily the most beautiful and immersive game I have ever played, and I am completely drawn in.

I realize that may change as cracks in the gameplay emerge, or bugs appear… But this is the most alive and incredible open world I’ve experienced.

Skyrim gave me similar feels on release… But this is just wow.

This still isn’t even available to purchase on Sony’s store, right? That roadmap seems terrible. I can’t believe they’re working on multiplayer before getting now-current gen console versions out the door.

Edit: whoops! That text is small, I read “multiple updates & improvements” as “multiplayer updates & improvements”.

That makes more sense. Still disappointing to wait so long for the updated console versions, but oh well.

As someone who deleted the game after just a couple of janky hours at launch, this update wasn’t very reassuring. I’m surprised that the reception to the Youtube video (just going by the likes to dislikes ratio) is nearly entirely positive.

I hate you. Just wanted to put that out there. I’d kill for that display.

I have the same 3080/48" LG OLED setup. I have to disagree that it’s a good fit for Cyberpunk or any next gen title. 4k with RTX and all settings on Ultra can’t be pushed at a consistent 60+ fps by a 3080. Even w Quality DLSS. I’ve reverted to my 3440*1440 ultrawide display. A much better experience.

My 55" LG OLED looks great running the game at 1440p…

I haven’t noticed any dips in framerate at all, everything on max

I was there and I liked the game for what it was on release. You can check the Qt3 thread to confirm. But it had issues for sure.

That said, comparing the game NMS is today to what it was on release, I can notice much more clearly how barren it was, and how much more it could be (and eventually came to be). I didn’t need many of the improvements to appreciate the game, but all the improvements definitely made NMS a better game.

Cyberpunk 2077 is different for me. The broken parts are way too visible for me to dismiss. I played NMS on release and enjoyed it for what it was. But in the case of Cyberpunk, I loved the first couple hours, until the bugs and the braindead AI began to sour my experience. I still soldiered on for another 10-15 hours, but seeing all the issues and wondering all the time if something that happened is a bug or intended ruined the experience for me, so I uninstalled for the time being. I’ll come back to it after (a lot of?) patches.

I think they are different cases. NMS is more replayable, procgen, narrative-less game, so you can improve pieces of it. Like, they can add new random creatures you can find, in another update they can improve the ships, in another the crafting, etc.

In CP case, what are they going to do? Are they going to iterate over the main quest, adding some extra choices and consequences? Are they going to add new ways to solve a side mission?
They can improve the cop system for example, but are people going to replay a 80 hour single player game with the same story for that?

Fix the AI, fix cops, add content in the forms of consequences for your actions in sidequests, improve immersion by fixing traffic and NPC AI, balance abilities, etc. There’s a lot of things to be done in terms of mechanics.

Which is why I stopped playing and uninstalled. I want the premium experience and I can wait for it. The “Enhanced Edition” of Cyberpunk 2077, perhaps? Like they did with all the Witchers. One man can dream.

But even putting aside the fact that NMS fell so short of the hype, perhaps you forget that there were critical, game breaking bugs at release. Like common issues where the core what chain would break, and then you wouldn’t get fundamental recipes like warp fuel, and then couldn’t leave the first system.

I mean, i played it at release as well, and i probably enjoyed it more than most as i tend to be able to work around such bugs… But NMS was absolutely broken in very fundamental ways at release.

I never noticed it was broken in that way. The Atlas key thing was inconsequential to the way I was playing, and it was fixed before it became an issue for me, and it’s also the only “game-breaking” bug I can recall. Sure, there were issues with texture streaming and whatnot, but those were not a big deal either.

But NMS had the advantage of being a new, unique thing, which made its faults less apparent. Cyberpunk 2077 is in a well established genre, which makes all its faults even more glaring. Seeing similar animals in NMS? A limitation of the technology, I get it. Seeing identical NPCs in Cyberpunk? Immersion breaking.

NMS was trying something completely new. That makes one more accepting of oversights and mistakes because, well, it’s a new thing. It’s unexplored space, and as such you must expect issues and limitations. Cyberpunk 2077 was supposed to be an evolution of something we already know well, with several celebrated games it could be compared to.

Cyberpunk 2077 and NMS have many things in common, though. The sheer ambition. The hype machine before release, including lies about the state of the game and what it could or could not do. The does-not-live-up-to-the-hype-at-all release.

Now the question is whether the post-release support will be as good for CP2077 as it was for NMS. Hello Games just sat in silence and let their work on the game speak more than words, the improvements they made, offered for free, serving as an apology and a statement of intent. They were set on making NMS the game they wanted it to be. And they’re still doing that to this day.

I can’t say the same of CDPR, though. The video shifts blame and avoids many raised issues, and their “plan” lacks any details on what they are fixing and why. But maybe their work on the game will speak for itself. We’ll see.

This is true. But what @TurinTur brings up is valid, I think. Much of what needs to be changed impacts the main pillar of the game, the storyline and V’s path. In particular, one of the game’s most glaring weaknesses, the lack of any sort of faction or reputation system to tie together all of the different gangs and players, who it is implied though not implemented that they have their own agendas, priorities, and what not, can’t be fixed I don’ think without fundamentally changing the game world and affecting V’s choices and options relative to the main quest. Not, at least, without further compartmentalizing the main quest line from the rest of the world.

The game is the unholy amalgamation of an open-world sandbox with severely underdeveloped or broken components and a linear, narrative-driven story RPG with severely underdeveloped or broken components. The flashes of brilliance in both areas are enough for folks like me to put in a ton of hours, but ultimately neither part of the game really works, nor does the unified whole.

Some of those things might be possible to implement in updates and patches. They could add a gang reputation system, for instance. But giving more weight to your choices in the game, and further expanding the effect of those choices in the world? Nearly impossible without essentially making a new game. And yeah, all those improvements would isolate the main quest even more.

I guess CDPR realized at some point that they couldn’t live up to their own ambition within any reasonable timeframe and tried to make do with what was possible. And they’re unwilling to admit that because it’s embarassing. Or maybe they got so entangled in the technical aspects of the game’s look and feel (and they allude to that in the video when they talk of the streaming technology) that they failed to give the proper attention to other parts of the game.

So yeah, maybe it isn’t “fixable”. I want to see they try, though. It’s the least CDPR can do to recover some of the good will they lost with the whole thing.

As comparison, here’s the first post-release communication done by Hello Games back in 2016, a month after the release of the game:

Hello,

Over the last few weeks since No Man’s Sky released we’ve been inundated with feedback and discussion about No Man’s Sky.

No matter what feedback you gave us, you have been heard and we are listening carefully. Thank you.

Here’s what we’ve been busy with in the weeks since release:

  • A community/support management team has been brought on board.
  • Support issues raised are been categorised by that team, and we are fixing them in order of priority.
  • We’ve released a bunch of patches for PC and PS4.
  • We’ve written up patch notes for all those patches. You can find them here.

What matters now, as always, is what we do rather than what we say. We’re developers, and our focus is first on resolving any issues people have with the game as it is, then on future free updates which will improve, expand and build on the No Man’s Sky universe.

This is a labour of love for us, and it’s just the beginning.

If you have suggestions please mail (email address)

Thank you,
Hello Games