EA announces next Medal of Honor game

From the press release. No mention of a PC version.

EA STORMS THE PACIFIC THIS FALL WITH MEDAL OF HONOR RISING SUN

REDWOOD CITY, Calif. - March 3, 2003 -Step into the boots of a Marine Corporal, survive the devastating attack on Pearl Harbor, and drive the Japanese Army from the Pacific in Medal of Honor Rising Sun from Electronic Arts (NASDAQ: ERTS). Developed by EALA, Medal of Honor Rising Sun creates an immersive and authentic WWII experience in either single-player or multi-player modes. Medal of Honor Rising Sun will be available for the PlayStation®2 computer entertainment system, the Nintendo GameCube and the Xbox video game system from Microsoft in the fall of 2003.

Set for the first time in the Pacific Theatre of Operations from 1941-1944, Medal of Honor Rising Sun gives players a sense of the courage it took to fight the Japanese from Pearl Harbor to the shores of the Philippine Islands. Players will assume the role of Marine Corporal Joseph Griffin, as he survives the attack on Pearl Harbor, leads the assault of Guadalcanal, and finally rescues his brother from a Japanese POW camp in the Philippines. Armed with his wits and a variety of authentic weapons, it’s up to players to stop the Japanese war machine in its tracks. Players can even team up with a friend in the all-new co-op multiplayer mode to battle the Japanese forces. Along the way, players will earn awards and medals for their meritorious service in defeating the enemy.

As with the original Medal of Honor™, the producers sought council from numerous outside sources to make certain the game is as historically authentic and realistic as possible. EALA continues to work closely with the Congressional Medal of Honor Society to ensure Medal of Honor Rising Sun reflects the ideals and integrity of the prestigious Medal of Honor. In addition, Capt. Dale Dye, who served as military technical advisor on the previous titles in the Medal of Honor franchise, continues his efforts with the Medal of Honor Rising Sun team to ensure the authenticity of the game.

Another console MoH game doesn’t mean another PC MoH game won’t happen (I hope). They never released a PC version of Frontline, either.

Separate development teams AFAIK. Pretty sure they’ll do another PC game too…but maybe for further down the road. Nice to see this game is coming to all three consoles. Wonder if it’s really going to be a simultaneous released on all three or if there’s an exclusivity on one of the systems?

Is Kevin Perry involved in this one?

–Dave

Here’s the problem.

…the producers sought council from numerous outside sources to make certain the game is as historically authentic and realistic as possible.

I am not or have not been an infantryman. However, I have read enough about infantry combat to know that it wasn’t really skill that kept these guys alive. You learn to keep your head down and not to do stupid stuff, sure, but well, at any second you could wounded or killed just because, well, its war.

I was playing my $10 Destroyer Command this weekend. The role of a destroyer in WW2 surface combat seems to be

  1. get in, fire torpedos
  2. die

As such, sometimes the only way to advance from mission to mission is to basically, be a complete pussy of a destroyer captain.

Same thing for many military games. Realism would involve the horribly unfun situation of “dying through no fault of your own”. In BF1942, well, you got killed by another player, and can deal with it, because you can do the same.

However, say I was playing Medal of Honor Allied Assault on the Omaha Beach level, and there was no magic “avoid the bullets and run from obstacle to obstacle” trick. When I saw that, I went “GAMEY! CHEAP!” but at the same time, I am hard pressed to figure out how one COULD make a realistic Omaha beach level without resorting to quickload.

Any thoughts? How does one make a realistic gaming experience when reality dicates that the player will just randomly die on occasion?

Ok, I can’t let this go, because I have been an “infantryman” (pissant Army term, that) in the Marine Corps. You’re quite wrong. Skill has a great deal to do with your ability to stay alive–not 100% to do with it, nor in certain situations much at all, but most of the time the better skilled troops are the ones alive at the end of the battle.

Yep.

Among other things, I’m the lead designer on this one.

Please don’t bombard me with questions, though, because I’m not sure what I can say publicly. My guess is nada.

Actually, strike that. Please bombard me with questions. I’ll evade them, but at least it will be a live thread to oppose MOO3 and DC2.

So no PC version, Kevin?

You don’t. This is why most people don’t want too much reality in their games (flight simmers, especially ATC guys, aside). Reality isn’t fun. A lot of good men died storming that beach, often completely randomly. Not much skill can do for you if your Higgins boat gets popped by a mortar.

You want to make an authentic game-- where the weapons, environments, and mission types are as real as possible. . . but the situations are exaggerated, and the player is unquestionably a hero by video game standards.

For example, since the press release mentioned Pearl Harbor, I guess I can too. We have done exhaustive research on the attack on Pearl Harbor. Everything shown will be as historically accurate as possible. Except the player role, which will be exaggerated to match the proper video game hero role, although blended into the context as much as we can.

Note that this reveals again the divide between PC and console games; console games have never been subject to the realism confusions.

Press release doesn’t mention one.

Anything I say will get me into trouble. Sorry, Mark.

[quote="“Kevin Perry”"]

Kevin,

I once visited you guys as a guest of one of the programmers, Steve Agoston, I think. We arrived like bunch of dorky, 30-year-old school kids with his wife as our tour guide. It was fantastic. Even better than meeting David Crane a month later at our offices and discussing how he helped Carol Shaw design “River Raid”. Anyway, if anyone doesn’t already know, those EALA guys LIVE,EAT and BREATHE MOH. If you ever thought they were not serious about what they do, you are wrong.

+1 me!

That’s cool, Kevin! Did you ever think while designing Shadow Watch you’d become lord and master of an entry in the Medal of Honor series? :)

I guess the only question you could hopefully answer is “How long have you been at EALA again?”, which will in turn possibly answer how long this game has been in development given you’re the lead designer. ;)

–Dave

Hey, I don’t wanna get you in trouble or anything, you can PM me with the answer but; who wins?

I like to have cool sci-fi weapons, I don’t care that the sound made by the rifles were recorded by going back in time and hiding microphones at the gun range, or if the guns realistically jam every couple of minutes, I wanna kill me some bad guys in fun and creative ways.

This is probably old hat, especially considering the source, but I remember one of the Valve guys talking about Team Fortress 2. They said they weren’t making a game about war, they were making a game about war movies.

Of course, three years later, it’s questionable whether or not they were making anything at all, but the point was good one.

It’s interesting to note as war movies have evolved, games about war have as well. Saving Private Ryan has had significant impact on computer games.

 -Tom

Ironically enough, SW and the original MoH were developed at about the same time.

As a side note to this discussion, if you haven’t played the original MoH on PS1, go get it if you can find it. If you can get past the hideous PS1 graphics (and I mean hideous, even by PS1 standards), the gameplay is really amazing and holds up completely. It lacks the cinematic feel of MoH:FL, but plays (IMHO) much better.

I’ve been at EALA for five weeks now, and I can promise you that the build shown today at the press event is a lot more than five week’s worth of work. So no info available there. (I was the last element of the design team to be added.) That’s nowhere near as bad as it sounds, because there’s a team history back to MoH, and, as Mr. Jones points out, there is an amazing amount of esprit-de-corps around here, the likes of which I’ve never seen.

Nice try, though.

All the MoHs carry the Created By Steven Spielberg line in the credits. The original MoH was suggested by him to accompany SPR; EALA was Dreamworks at the time.

You’re also dead on about the war movie feel. Some of the initial coverage of today’s event mentioned, of all things, The Thin Red Line.

Easy to find and fun to play. It was a Greatest Hits title and you can often find it pre-owned at the very least at any EB. It’s cheap too.

I’ve been at EALA for five weeks now, and I can promise you that the build shown today at the press event is a lot more than five week’s worth of work. So no info available there. (I was the last element of the design team to be added.) That’s nowhere near as bad as it sounds, because there’s a team history back to MoH, and, as Mr. Jones points out, there is an amazing amount of esprit-de-corps around here, the likes of which I’ve never seen.

Nice try, though.

Thanks…wish it had been more fruitful. :)

Let’s try this one… Is simultaneous release on all three platforms assured? That may not be answerable, though. Maybe you can answer this one too… With a multiplatform game like this one, are you working on one platform first and then porting to the others or are you creating three games at once from the same design document? That always interests me with games like this set to debut on multiple platforms.

–Dave

Couldn’t agree with you more. Well, except on the sci-fi weapons thing; I’m pretty tired of indistinct fuzzy and bizarre guns in amny sci-fi games.

But anyway, I agree completely about the ‘killing bad guys in fun and creative ways’ part. That’s the best thing about working in WWII; it gives every single element a continuity and backstory that we don’t have to waste any time on.

And in speculative-fiction games, you have to invent EVERYTHING. This takes a lot of time, and often isn’t done that well. I don’t have to deal with that at all. Now, I can decide I want a crew-served weapon of medium to heavy strength to threaten the player at a given point. I can go to the Big Silver Bible of Japanese WWII arms, pick out the Type 92 70mm Howitzer, and show it to the artists. I’m done with that part now, so I can spend the rest of my design time tweaking the Type 92 to feel right as a fun gun. Working in a sci-fi universe, I’d have to waste a lot of time and energy inventing such a gun, arguing with the art director and individual artist about what it should look like, and the arguing again with the sound team about what it should sound like.

WWII is the biggest license ever.

TOTALLY no way I can answer this one.

In all previous multi-platform games I’ve worked on, there has been a core SKU with the others being ports.

But that’s just my past, which has no bearing, eaither way, on my current job, which I hope to still have after posting these answers.

Hee hee…ok, I’ve outed you, and I don’t want you to lose your job or anything, so I’ll shut up now. ;)

–Dave

Ok, I can’t let this go, because I have been an “infantryman” (pissant Army term, that) in the Marine Corps. You’re quite wrong. Skill has a great deal to do with your ability to stay alive–not 100% to do with it, nor in certain situations much at all, but most of the time the better skilled troops are the ones alive at the end of the battle.[/quote]

I know this, but, well, I look at casualty stats from infantry divisions from WW2, and 200% casualties means, well, no matter how good you are, your number is going to come up.