HD DVD keys are out in public, world ends

http://www.hddvdkey.com/

Also, if you go to Digg.com, every single story on the front page is a link to some version of the codes.

http://rudd-o.com/archives/2007/04/30/spread-this-number/

Apparently the giant stink is that Digg.com has been censoring posts, so everybody is now flooding the site with postings of the codes. User accounts being deleted, etc. I can’t say I blame Digg for trying to cover their asses in this situation - but when your target audience is a bunch of technocrats, anti DMCA and DRM nuts, well, it’s really hard to supress this sort of thing, eh?

I wonder if this will have an effect on the HD DVD vs. Blu-ray battle. Will studios be pissed that HD DVD was the source of the crack and turn to Blu-ray?

And next week it will be blu-ray’s turn.

I hope so, just so the score is evened.

I wonder if the HD-DVD key is up on the Playstation Marketplace yet…

These people are assholes.

Which people?

To quote Slashdot:

If you had a lock that kept out only the people you actually wanted in, but couldn’t keep out those that were actually going to rob you blind, one would think that your solution might be a little more robust than “I’ll sue anyone who reports how badly my lock works”.

Maybe I’m dense, but I don’t get the metaphor. Who are the people they “want in” that are being locked out?

paying customers (there was some dvd that wouldn’t play for paying customers because of the copyright protection)

Ok. I guess I phrased that poorly. I assumed paying customers were who they meant were being locked out, I just didn’t know in what way they had been locked out; I wasn’t aware there’d been any specific incidents like that.

I read it as a general comment on how DRM only really inconveniences paying customers, and not pirates. Viz: HDCP etc.

Woah, it’s true, the entire Digg front page is all stories with the key!

Morons.

I somehow suspect most of the people actually wanting to use the key haven’t paid the license fees for the various patents involved. Though neither have I, for all the VOB streams I’ve created so far…

(Insert standard debate over the validity of software patents here.)

I bet you’re right; certainly has been the case so far with each breach. Was there an intersting story behind this one that anyone has a link to?

Heh, I just had checked the gaming feed and, guess what, there is a new “Secret Code To Remove Lara Craft’s Clothes in Tomb Radier Legends!”

-Julian

It is funny to think that you can receive a DMCA takedown notice for a domain name, or the title of a news story, or a little icon – anything that manages to cram 16 characters together. Like a google search: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=09+F9+11+02+9D+74+E3+5B+D8+41+56+C5+63+56+88+C0

Digg’s official response: http://blog.digg.com/?p=74&t=0

Apparently, the founder of Digg has surrendered to the masses.

  • Alan

[EDIT] beaten by Quaro’s ninja edit!

You know surrender isn’t quite the right word for this.

Just because this is repeated doesn’t mean it makes sense. Most customers have no idea there is any DRM on their DVDs/HD-DVD. Who does notice this is those people who try to copy the DVDs and it fails. I know, I know, I am wrong, because some guy on slashdot brother’s neice’s friend from high school mom had a problem trying to play a DVD in a cd player.

With the digg stuff, I just don’t get why they didn’t follow the google example of how to react to such C&Ds.

Chet