Help! Professor Leyton's kicking my ass!

Okay, so I’ve started playing Professor Leyton and the Mysterious Village in earnest now and so far I’ve done okay on the game’s main puzzles for as far as I’ve gotten, but on the weekly downloadable puzzles, I’m stumped on not the answer, but how the answer is arrived at, despite the explanation at by the game. You guys tell me what you think.

So here’s the puzzle:

A teacher who has a student that hates to study said this:

“Study every day before the test for one week. Every time you study, you must do for 2 hours without stopping.”

So it can’t be helped, the student decides to, for one week only, follow the warning, but he would like to cut down the time as much possible by doing it deceptively.

So if you follow what the teacher says, in one week, what’s the least amount of hours the student can study?

After your first failure, the game also reminds you that it’s the least amount of time possible given the directions and encourages you that there must some sort of trick.

On the bottom screen is a little calendar below the humorous picture of the student studying while thinking of his ugly irate teacher and the teacher. The calendar that our week of studying in question before the test, will be starting Monday and ending Sunday.

So I gave three answers. I didn’t feel very good about the first, because it seemed too easy to just say fourteen and I wasn’t very surprised when that wasn’t it.

My second answer was that if the student studies 1 hour on at the end of a day, then when it goes to midnight the next day, it will have counted as another day and he can finish up his second hour in that day. Using this system, I figured 7 hours, because Sunday he’d only have to study for the hour. Technically the second hour would fall into next week and wouldn’t be counted in the first week.

That wasn’t right. So I tried 8, thinking maybe it needs to be two hours on Sunday. That was the correct answer.

The game explains that he needs to study both hours on Sunday, but not why.

My question is why is seven not possible? Anyone have any ideas, because it bugs me.

-Kitsune

You mean 2, right? Well anyway, your answer is here. He had to study that final day for two hours or else he’d be breaking the rule.

If you meant 2 hours without stopping and not 12, then you made a HUGE typo.

Yeah yeah, I fixed it. It is two hours.

Yeah, but it asks how much in one week, technically, one he passes midnight on Sunday, it is no longer the previous week and becomes the next week, right?

The next weekly puzzle is priceless, BTW in that it is one of those most famous cases of misdirection. Having been bad at geometry, I still can’t figure out how to cut a piece of perfect triangle konnyaku so that a perfect square shows on four sides. And no, I don’t want the answer if you know it, I’ll figure it out somehow! :P

-Kitsune

But he still has to study for two hours without stopping.

Yes, but the question asks how much in one week, not how much in all. So by that logic, he may still have to study 2 hours, but it’s not in one week. If the student were to continue the regimen, he could just use that to do seven hours each week, whereas splitting one day alone into two, wouldn’t be the least he could do.

-Kitsune

I see what you’re saying, but he’d still be doing 8 hours of study before the test.

There are 7 days in a week. 7/2 = 3.5, so the student can’t do the splitting trick every day. On the remaining day, the student must study the full two hours. If we can arbitrarily pick which 7 day period we are talking about, the answer would be zero, because he doesn’t have to study a week after the test, for example.

Is it because he has to start studying on that last day no later than 10pm?

Because if he doesn’t do the whole two hours on the final day, he hasn’t studied every day AND for a 2 hours block each time he starts studying?

Oh, I guess the point is that if you start studying at 11pm the day before the test, how does that figure into it.

Monday 11 pm-Tuesday 1 am
Wednesday 11pm - Thursday 1 am
Friday 11 pm - Saturday 1 am
Sunday 11 am - Monday 1 am

Technically you’ve studied 2 hours at each go. However, calculation wise, only 7 hours in week 1, and one hour on the day of the test itself (not required, but purely to minimise the amount of hours per week).

Except if that Monday 12am-1am hour doesn’t qualify because it didn’t happin in Week 1, you didn’t study for 2 hours straight. So you’d need to study gtom 10pm Sunday-Midnight in order to “qualify”, and that’s how I’m guessing they get 8 as the correct answer.

Monday (I’m assuming the test is on Monday) is not a day before the test. So if you’re going to study every day before the test for one week, and every time you study you do it for 2 hours without stopping, you can’t overflow from Sunday night into Monday (day of test).

The question is badly phrased, they mean total studying time. If they meant time in one week, you could get arbitrarily close to 6 hours.

Okay, here’s another one I don’t quite understand, keep in mind this one is from the main storyline of Professor Leyton, so if you’re planning on playing through the game and keeping all the answers a secret so you can solve them on your own.

The weights are numbered from one to eight at the bottom of the screen and you can put on as many as you like on the scale, but only actually weigh them twice. You cannot weigh them, take them off one at a time and see what effect it has on the scale, it only re-measures once you push the button.

I arrived at the answer in a fashion where I’d always get it right 50% of the time, but not 100%. Basically, you put four weights on each one, whichever is lighter, you then weigh between the two sets of weights in that set and pick from one of the two that are lighter there for the answer.

Through looking at the game’s hints and answers, and trying again, I found out the way to get 100% each time is to weigh only the six at first, with three on each side. From there, if both sides are equal, then it must be two of that you didn’t weigh.

What I don’t get though, is if both sides aren’t equal. Then you have to take one and compare two of the lightest side, and take off all of the heavier side. It’s easy to figure which of the three are lightest then, but what about the remaining two that haven’t been weighed, how does one with 100% certainty they aren’t the lightest? It works every time when I try it this way.

-Kitsune

There’s only one light weight. If the scales are uneven when you weigh six, then you know the other two are the normal weight. If they aren’t, you know one of the two unweighed is the light one.

If the light one is in the six, you take the three from the light side and pick two.

If those two weigh even, you know the third is the light. If not, the scale tells you which is the light one.

I know what happens when they’re even, but how do you know that the other two are normal weight, when they could the be the lightest of all eight, because you don’t know how much they weigh from not weighing them?

-Kitsune

There’s only one abnormal one.

Only one is lighter, the other seven are all the same weight. Thus if the scale balances with 3 on each side, it must be one of the remaining 2. If one side tips up with three on each side, though, weigh two of those three on the scale, one on each side. If one side tips up, it’s the lighter one obviously. If the scale is balanced, it’s the remaining weight.

Ha ha! I really, really like this puzzle! I solved it with a hint in the Japanese version (where I believe it is a tad bit harder) but I think I could translate the basics of the puzzle into English, so why don’t you guys try it?

On the desk are spread out cards and on each card, is written a word that looks as if it might strike a meaning.

Among these words, there is only one that is said to not quite fit in the group with the rest, which one is it?

The cards/words are:

pen
uminum
agara
robi
capone
arm
geria
lon
tingale
amo
ce guy

Note and possibly a hint, I’ve replaced two of the words with what would be a better English hint and one with the better English equivalent, seeing as how I doubt too many are familiar with Japanese writing and katakana here. The riddle will still work, though not quite in the same fashion.

Here’s the Japanese version for anybody who wants to quibble or knows Japanese, the directions are the same but I will retype them out in Japanese:

机の上に広げられたカードには、それぞれ意味ありげな言葉が書かれている。

この中に、ひとつだけ仲間はずれの言葉があるというのだが、それはどれだろう。

ぺん
ミニウム
アガラ
スミドル
ゼンチン
ロビ
ジェリア
ロン
カポネ
チンゲール
バイト

Hint for the English version:
*
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*
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*
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*
*
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*
*
It has nothing to with the number of letters.
*
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Hint for the Japanese version:
*
*
*
*
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*
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Existence.
*
*
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*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
-Kitsune

On the desk are spread out cards and on each card, is written a word that looks as if it might strike a meaning.

Among these words, there is only one that is said to not quite fit in the group with the rest, which one is it?

The cards/words are:

pen - ???
uminum - al
agara - ni
robi - I’m guessing a typo here because you wold have nai
capone - al
arm - al
geria - al or ni
ron - ???
tingale - I am guessing you have a typo leaving out the ‘gh’, because then you have ni
amo - al
ce guy - ni