Horizon: Zero Dawn - Spoilers in your face


#77

To build on this, I think the timeline looks like this:

  1. Faro corp’s newest titan Class peacekeepers go online. They’re the premiere entity in robotic “peacekeeping”.

  2. “Not long after”, somebody notices that while the Peacekeepers are performing their functions, oh fuck we don’t seem to have actual control and can’t turn them off.

  3. It’s immediately obvious where this is heading. The swarms are growing. They are not an immediate thread - they’re just as likely roaming open country as doing anything else, adn they still aren’t that large. But there’s no way to deal with them. There are no failsafes. Conventional, human centered, armed-forces are a thing of decades past.

  4. Faro calls Sobeck in. He’s freaked out by her solution, as he should be (I just adore this aspect of the story, and how they keep revisiting it like the orbital launch base welcome center). However, this is the only time Faro is anything other than completely helpful and doing everything in his power to facilitate Horizon Zero, until he eventually disappears into his underground pyramid.

What I took from the timeline is that at this point swarms weren’t actively doing a ton of damage other than maybe overruning croplands here and there, but those could be easily replaced. Nobody is really thinking anything is going on, outside of a select few (Joint Chiefs, etc). And everyone outside of Faro/Sobeck who thinks something is up is probably sitting there thinking “Faro, shut the fucking robots off already”. I don’t think they find out the truth until Sobeck flies to meet them, but I may be wrong.

It’s not the most tightly written backstory ever, and I get why it bothers some people. But I think Faro’s continued involvement is reasonable in-universe. It’s crucial that at first everything appear normal, and after that it’s crucial that people think there’s a winnable war going on.

Man I love this game.


#78

You can read a bunch of fun little news stories about Faro robots misbehaving early on, like harvesting some poor farmer mango grove or eating a pod of endangered dolphins.


#79

In real life you can crash the world economy, and nothing bad happens to you.


#80

I don’t understand how Ted Faro was alive to be a pyschopath yet again after almost everybody was dead. They called the killer robots the Faro plague you would think somebody would have shot him in the balls repeatedly before everyone else was wiped out.


#81

You just know the sequel is about the AI he secretly made and uploaded his dip-shit personality to.


#82

Ooooh or his personal vault AI spawned a new Faro-clone to do battle with the Elizibet clone. THERE CAN ONLY BE ONE!


#83

#84

Knowing that there was a after-credits sequel hook, and having found out the details of project Zero Dawn, this is totally where I thought they were going. What a bummer that it was instead a bullshit resurrection of the big bad.

The gameplay was great, Aloy is one of my favorite game protagonists, and the writing was good 95% of the time. Those can be built on, so presumably a sequel will be just fine. But they can’t repeat the slow reveal of this cool scifi backstory with tragedies within tragedies. They really need to have a better story planned than a cabal of Faro clones trying to execute their failed plan again.


#85

So what was everyone’s favorite/least favorite robot to fight?

It’s probably common but I loved the Thunderjaw. The first time I ran into one of those things I was completely unprepared and it smoked me but it was so intimidating and the design is so great. Even at the end fighting one never got easy per se but it became an awesome battle where you really have to use a lot of your tools to succeed.

On the other hand I hate Stalkers, right up to the end. I hate their camo, I hate their speed, I hate how they take out half your life in one hit, I hate their damn alarms. I would actively avoid fighting these things because they were such a pain in the ass.


#86

I hate the damn Glinthawks. Congratulations, you reinvented the Cliff Racer. Only now they come in packs and have a ranged freezing attack, which totally doesn’t make them more annoying.

My favourite is the Rockbreaker, just because I did the quest in the quarry north of Meridian when I was very under-leveled and that fight was epic. Best moment in the game for me, wish they’d been more like it.


#87

I really liked all the robots, though some of the low end ones were a bit too similar to each other. The best thing about them was that the designers had confidence in their combat system and the robots themselves, so that there was no need for gimmicky boss fights - you’re just fighting the same enemies as usual, but in controlled situations. The fight with the Thunderjaw at the end of Cauldron Zeta, for example. That was an absolutely epic fight for me, but it’s the same Thunderjaw you’ll find anywhere else.


#88

Yeah I really appreciated that too, it helped make the world feel real in a way. I actually thought the cauldron end fights were a little too easy because I could take as much time as I wanted laying tripwires and traps around the whole room before I released the Dino. I actually found out during that Thunderjaw cauldron fight that the number of tripwires/traps the game will allow you to place is limited. I was placing them all around every possible exit point from the central holding pen and it would only let me get about halfway before it started removing the first ones a layer down. Kind of frustrating but also amusing. My favorite T-jaw fight was in one of the side quests to get the T-jaw heart where you end up in that bottleneck canyon and the T-Jaw is stomping around knocking down these tall trees and there’s no place to hide. It was all very epic and intense.


#89

Yeah, that was a good fight. Especially since that was the fight that really thought me how useful taking out specific modules is, and how best to do it. That fight at a low level is just a total pain unless you can take out the burrowing modules quickly. The other thing I liked there was how the story around that side quest hinted at the sound sensitivity of the Rockbreakers without outright stating it. So it felt like I was actually being clever and discovering it myself, even though it was actually being spoonfed by the game :)

Not sure I’d call them my favorite opponents though. I only fought them twice, both times during missions, and avoided them in the openworld. By contrast, I made occasional trips to clean out Thunderjaw and Behemoth areas just for fun.


#90

Disagree - they’re an exercise in archery. You need to hit the armoured section on their chest to reveal their weak spot, then hit that to do huge damage to them, if not killing them outright. The Longleg has a similar weakness.


#91

I think my favorites were the Behemoths, but other than the Glinthawks (Fuck those guys) I had a ton of fun in every fight.


#92

I had a lot of fun with stealth and corruption arrows on things like Glinthawk packs.


#93

I always just tripple loaded the hunter bow with fire arrows, and nuked them.


#94

I am playing on the highest difficulty and also found the Glinthawks a pain.

My strategy for dealing with them is as follows.

Put on stealth armour
Lay down about 10 traps near their location
Override any mount creature
Ride it into the traps

From here you can kill it and the Glinthawks will land for scrap, or leave it and they will land to attack it.

Then put on Chill armor and use fire arrows. As soon as they fall melee and critical strike.

Works for Stormhawks as well.

I love how this game gives you creative ways to solve problems,


#95

Ok, I stand corrected. That’s a pretty cool way to fight them :)


#96

Just completed the game. Staggering. For me it hit every possible button.

Zelda is up next. I know its supposed to be good but that is a very tough act to follow.