How to make your car run on vegetable oil

http://greasenotgas.com/home.html

There are no viable alternative fuels, I guess.

I have a friend who has a business filtering cooking oil for restaurants. He’s ran into a guy who has shown him how to convert the waste oil into diesel. He says it costs about 20 cents AU a litre to make (petrol is currently about $1.30). He’s an avid home-brewer, so he’s viewing this as the next step up in the self-sufficiency ladder.

Of course, your car smells like french fries, but oh well.

I don’t knnow if you go outside much, but current model cars are not odor free.

Have a couple of friends looking into whether they can convert their van to run on Biodiesel (veg oil to you and me). Economically it appears to make sense, especially with UK prices (hovering just under £1.00 a litre for diesel at the moment which is way more than a litre of veg oil).

Of course, your car smells like french fries, but oh well.

I’d rather that than the choking clouds of shit they spew out at the moment. Given the recent study that suggests smoking a single cigarette a day for x years triples your chance of heart disease, I wonder if they’ve looked into the effect of walking down a busy road once a day and what effect that has.

All of the busses here run on biodiesel.

One problem is that you can’t run it in cold climates by itself in the winter–I believe people mix it with gasoline. And fat deposits build up in your fuel lines… kind of like what happens when you eat french fries.

Great, it’ll be like a race to see who has the heart attack first, my car or me.

Maybe their will be a “your car and you” artery cleaning service that gives discounts.

Most cars that use biodiesel have a switch to change from gasoline in one tank to biodiesel in the other one. That way you heat the engine up on a cold day with gasoline, and then switch over to the biodiesel once it warms up enough to flow through the engine properly.

According to that site, straight vegetable oil is different from biodiesel. The advantage of straight vegetable oil is that you can just buy it and stick it in your car after you modify your car to accept it. The advantage of biodiesel is that, once you make it out of vegetable oil, any diesel car can use it without modification. Again, according to that site.

Biodiesel’s limitations are the same as normal diesel. In any cold climate, diesel vehicles need to warm up for at least twenty minutes to a half hour, to avoid potential damage to the engine.

. . . .

When was the last time you drove a diesel? Alternatively, do you live north of the polar circle?

Regular diesel has the same problem, though (high gelling temperature). They make cold-weather additives for diesel fuel; I wonder if they also work for biodiesel? You can also use regular diesel fuel in a biodiesel car.

You can’t use regular gasoline, though. It’s still a diesel car, with a diesel engine. Putting gasoline in a diesel engine is a good recipe for a very expensive trip to the mechanic.

Regular diesel has the same problem, though (high gelling temperature). They make cold-weather additives for diesel fuel; I wonder if they also work for biodiesel? You can also use regular diesel fuel in a biodiesel car.
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They should work. You can get 100% biodiesel at some (not many) gas stations, but almost all diesel is some percentage biodiesel. I believe that site says that the most common diesel you find at filling stations in the US is 20% biodiesel.

Both of my parents drive busses. Perhaps the restriction only applies to large engines. shrug. And yes, they live in northern Alberta, so my info could be slightly slanted.

Okay, I don’t know about bus engines. Normal-sized diesel cars with modern engines need only negligible warm-up time, even in (European) winter – a few minutes at most.

It’s still an issue in serious climates. I saw a diesel VW New Beetle crap out during one of our cold snaps here in Vermont… it died while running, and couldn’t get going because of the low temps.

My dad runs his truck on biodiesel and its pretty slick. He only does it during the spring / summer months but when he is running on it he says he gets about 20% better mpg. Also as said above with bio you don’t have to do anything to the engine to get it going. Just throw it in and off you go.

it also saves him about 75 cents a gallon if not more.

It is indeed slick

Well, to be fair, I’m talking about winters where the average from mid december through february is -30C. Even gasoline cars need to be warmed up for a few minutes in those temperatures (not to mention they have to be plugged in or they just won’t start).