Immigration in the US


#2427

Then try to do it already and stop blabbing.


#2428

Detailed post from reddit (spoiler for length):

Summary

A comment I made a few days ago:

The numbers were more than likely calculated by the Senate Appropriations Committee. Sen. Merkley is a member of that committee so he would have access to those numbers.

This information was released in several Minority press releases this month by Committee Vice Chairman Patrick Leahy:

Over the last two years, Congress has provided nearly $1.7 billion to build or replace fencing on the southern border, but the Administration has hardly spent any of that money, and the projects it has undertaken have ballooned in cost. So far, only six percent of those funds have been spent. Six.

And:

And despite the President’s claims that additional wall funding is an urgent need, the Trump Administration has only spent six percent of the $1.7 billion the Congress has appropriated over the last two years to build or replace fencing on the southern border.

And:

FACT: Border fencing construction is not “under budget.” The largest stretch of fencing that Congress has funded, a 25 mile barrier in the Rio Grande Valley, has ballooned in cost, from $445 to $787 million – a price tag of $31.5 million per mile for taxpayers .

FACT: The Trump Administration has only spent 6 percent – SIX PERCENT – of the $1.7 billion the Congress has appropriated over the last two years to build or replace fencing on the southern border. That does not sound like an urgent need for additional billions in funding.

More:

For border security, the budget request includes an increase above fiscal year 2017 of $1,720,180,000 for U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to support a strategy of attaining operational control of the border. (p. 3)

The DHS Security Appropriations bill from this summer says that $1.6 billion was included in the budget request and it was restricted to “approximately 65 miles of pedestrian fencing in the Rio Grande Valley Sector in Texas” and not a border wall (p. 41).

It passed committee 26-5. Every Republican on the committee voted for it. Feinstein, Durbin, Udall, Merkley and Schatz voted No. (p. 122)

Some math:

$1.7 billion * 6% = $102 million spent over the last 2 years

$102 million spent / $31.5 million per mile = 3.2 miles of pedestrian fencing built or replaced during the past 2 years


#2429

Probably taking Trump and co time to spin up new family owned companies to utilize the contracts.


#2430

Good argument here that underscore’s Pelosi’s point above. Immigration hardliners in Congress want to stop immigration. If they thought the best way to to do that was to build the wall, they’d trade concessions in order to get Democratic support for the wall. But they won’t because the wall is a shit idea and they’d be fools to trade anything valuable for it. So there will be no deal and the wall won’t happen and eventually the pain of the shutdown will force him to the table. The vote on the 20th was pure political theater.


#2431

I feel your pain. I have at least one brother who probably deserves the Armando treatment upon death. I can only hope at some point he has an Ebenezer Scrooge moment and learns to live his life in a better way. He isn’t evil or a huge Trump fan, but he just doesn’t seem to understand a different point of view. He is the guy who points to the black person who is pro-Trump or pro-GOP and wonders what is wrong with other blacks.


#2432

I assume that if on Jan 3rd the new democratically controlled house votes in a new CR (again without the wall), and the senate approves it, that Trump will veto it?


#2433

Given the position that will put Trump in, why would McConnell even allow it to come to a vote?


#2434

Because then the blame would rest squarely on the GOP’s shoulders. Why not allow it to fall on Trump, where it belongs. Besides, I don’t think the GOP is all in for this shut down like Trump is.


#2435

Because McConnell isn’t ready to retire yet, and going against the President so confrontationally basically means he’s fine with Trump calling him out, supporting a primary opponent, etc.

McConnell is a lapdog, I have my doubts that he’ll go against the President.


#2436

He’s not going to sacrifice himself for Trump. If something is sufficiently popular, he will vote for it even if Trump doesn’t like it. See: Russia sanctions and NATO solidarity votes.


#2437

Can’t the house just pass what the Senate already passed, thus negating the need for the Senate to do anything at all?


#2438

This I don’t know. Does proposed legislation survive different terms or whatever a year is called?


#2439

Yes, i believe that it does.


#2440

If that’s the case, then yeah, I imagine the very first thing Pelosi will do is pass the Senate’s bill.

What Trump does then is anyone’s guess, including his. Cabinet members Hannity and Coulter will tell him to veto it, of course.


#2441

No. Once Congress adjourn at the end of its two year session, any bills that are not yet laws will die.

Otherwise it would be pure chaos. Imagine a divided Congress after an election where both houses flip. The Senate passes a bunch of bills for the next House to approve, meanwhile the House passes a bunch of contradictory laws for the next Senate to approve…


#2442

Lap turtle.


#2443

Yeah, that’s how pocket vetoes work.


#2444

Doesn’t sound that chaotic to me. They pass contradictory bills all the time. That’s what reconciliation is for.


#2445

Reconciliation is used when the House and Senate language in a law doesn’t match up.

But you could have a law passed with the same language by the current House and previous Senate, and simultaneously a contradictory law passed with the same language by the current Senate and previous House. For both laws, the language was approved by one of the Houses and one of the Senates, so reconciliation is not an option.

Furthermore, if you don’t kill a bill when the session expires, then any old language could be revived. So maybe Pelosi votes on a law that Reid’s Senate passed.
Meanwhile McConnell decides that it’s time to finally vote on a law passed by the Jacksonian House in the 19th century…


#2446

I was mistaken then.

I’m not sure that such a thing has ever happened. It would need a very weird set of circumstances for such a thing to happen.