KB Sale Not Useful - No Video Games, Systems, Accessories

I just came back from KB and thought I’d offer a report of my findings.

The KB I visited was putting up banners and such advertising the “You Win! Sale” for one week. In fine print it was stated that the sale does not apply to video games, systems, accessories, gift cards, or some other thing that sounded like video rental but isn’t important.

  1. Does it cover anything we care about? Not unless you’re a Lego fan or you like board games aimed at 8-year-olds.

  2. Do you have to show a receipt? No, certainly not.

  3. Does it apply to purchases over $30 or items over $30? Purchases, definitely. Go there and ring up more than $30 in items, before tax, and you will get 30% off. Not that anybody on this board cares anymore. :)

So what did I, the intrepid reporter do? Walked down to EB instead. Sure I paid the exact same price, but it’s the principle of the thing. :)

Not unless you’re a Lego fan or you like board games aimed at 8-year-olds.

Or, you have similarly aged children in your life (it being 2 months from Gift Giving Season).

Legos rule.

Except if you step on them barefoot in the middle of the night. They’re extremely painful.

That sucks about the sale.

Yeah. Bastards – particularly when some of the items I bought during the time covered by the suit were video games…

Still, gonna head down Wednesday and load up on discounted stuff for the son and nephew/nieces… Christmas is a’comin.

But I’ll buy the games from the EB across the hall.

So what is the deal here? They got sued and this is a class action settlement? Ha. What were they accused of?

olaf

KB made a practice of marking up all items with two prices. Normally there was a grossly overpriced price that was crossed off and replaced with a handwritten normal price that you would find anywhere. Thus, the goal was to fool consumers into thinking that they were getting a good deal when in fact they were paying normal prices or even higher.

Re: Legos ruling, it being gift-giving season, and so on. I agree on all of these counts, but it just didn’t make as blunt a statement so I fudged it. ;) Besides, the KB I visited had garbage for selection of Legos. Just a smattering of everything.

Thanks a bunch for checking this out, Silverlight. Saved me a useless trip to KB on Wednesday.

Um, doesn’t everybody do this with marking prices? I thought it was standard practice to list a big regular price and the super-duper sale price. I know you see this a lot in appliance and furniture stores.

The basis of the suit is that it is OK to list comparison prices if they have some grounding in reality. KB is accused of defrauding customers by making up fake high prices to make their regular prices look like bargains.

Except if you step on them barefoot in the middle of the night. They’re extremely painful.
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Wow, you just awoke long-repressed memories.

KB made a practice of marking up all items with two prices. Normally there was a grossly overpriced price that was crossed off and replaced with a handwritten normal price that you would find anywhere. Thus, the goal was to fool consumers into thinking that they were getting a good deal when in fact they were paying normal prices or even higher.

Re: Legos ruling, it being gift-giving season, and so on. I agree on all of these counts, but it just didn’t make as blunt a statement so I fudged it. ;) Besides, the KB I visited had garbage for selection of Legos. Just a smattering of everything.[/quote]

It’s illegal to lie about having a sale? Did I miss something?

I know, right? What’s society coming to when we can actually punish people for acting unscrupulously?

I guess you did, because that’s been illegal (at least in California) as long as I can remember. You can’t say that you’re selling something for “25% OFF!” if you’re really charging normal price, etc. This is shocking to you?