Kill Bill

Has anyone else seen it? If so, did you like it? I’m kinda conflicted. I’ll give it a 6/10 tentatively, but I need to think and/or talk about it before solidifying that.

Is it a pure action movie? What’s the blood/gore content like, with all those swords?

Lots of action, mostly with bladed weapons. Gore is high, blood is off the charts. I mean, lots and lots of fake blood. No matter what words I use to describe the amount of blood depicted in this film, you will still be surprised by the amount at least once. There is just a tremendous amount of bloodiness.

Seen in twice now, and I loved it more the second time. But then, I love the films and genres he’s riffing on with this.

I haven’t decided yet if I could actually recommend it to people who aren’t fans of chop-socky asian cinema and old school revenge movies.

And how about that Lucy Liu?

My interest is piqued. Does it have more arterial-spray-per-minute-of-cellulooid than, say, the old japanese Lone wolf and Cub Movies? Those were great. :)

There are dozens upon dozens of severed limbs, and each one sprays about a gallon of blood. So yeah, there’s lots.

Liu was good. She has one great scene in particular, and her character’s background is told through a wondeful anime sequence. Julie Dreyfus, however, is usually right next to her, and tops her in the looks department.

Uma won me over big time with her performance here. Not that big a fan before, but her range is on full display and she pulls it off.

Okay, Niagra Falls’ worth of blood, got it. uma gives a good performance, got it. But is it a good movie?

It’s not going to win any awards, but if it’s any consolation to Tarantino, he has put a smile on my face.

I thought it kicked all sorts of ass. Ol’ Quentin’s been watching a lot of kung fu and anime. The finale in the Tokyo restaurant was sheer action flick genius.

Also included a trailer for The Matrix Revolutions, which looks almost stone-dead boring to me at this point. Something tells me all the half-baked fan theories about the story’s resolution are going to be a hell of a lot more interesting than what actually happens.

~MJK

Liu (Lucy) should be banned from films. So non-lethal, why didn’t he get a real Asian female action star to play this part – there are tons of them. Liu (Gordon) should have been better used. Tarantino needs to learn to pull back the camera a bit when filming the action sequences. Maybe I’ve seen too many HK flicks and gotten so used to over-the-top bloodshed, but I wasn’t really blown away by the fight in the House of Blue Leaves. The fighting seemed stilted to me, which is what you get when you put relatively untrained actors into the main fighting roles.

As a fan of some of these films, I appreciated what Tarantino was trying to do, but in the end I don’t think he pulled it off as a coherent film. Too often I felt it was an homage that was focused on making you know it was paying homage. Also, I thought his attempts at playing with chronology seemed like a rehash of what he was doing with Pulp Fiction and Reservoir Dogs – in those, the messing around with chronology actually held a lot of surprises, whereas here it didn’t really (although this is based on just seeing the first half, so maybe he’s got more in store?).

Maybe I’ve seen too many HK flicks and gotten so used to over-the-top bloodshed, but I wasn’t really blown away by the fight in the House of Blue Leaves.

Kill Bill had to deal with the MPAA. Considering that, I think the amount of blood contained in this film is pretty amazing. It’s no Story of Ricki, but I can’t recall an American non-horror movie this bloody since Scarface (although I hear Bad Boys II is pretty hardcore).

I thought Lucy Liu was good myself. Maybe the whole anime background story added to it, but that and the scene at the table made her seem pretty ruthless to me.

Well, except for the fact that it’s not actually her in the anime. I think when I saw Lucy Liu struggle to whip out the samurai sword at the end (you can see her arms kind of flail out as she pulls it out of the sheath), I was kind of completely unable to buy her as an amazing sword-demoness or whatever. The only scene where Lucy Liu specifically was right for the role was the comedy bit after she lopped the guy’s head, but even that was kind of lame with her trying to be menacing with the profanity.

I’m officially registering a big thumbs-up for Volume 1. Pure unadulterated, unapolagetic, good-time-at-the-movies fun. Can’t wait for Volume 2.

The movie was just too self-consciously 70’s hip for me to get into. I didn’t feel like the movie was involved with it’s characters, so why should I be? I’ve rarely been so aware, when watching a film, of the fact that I was sitting in a theater, watching a film.

Still, I think it was exactly the movie that Tarantino wanted to make. I give it a solid gentleman’s B.

Saw it today and I really, really liked the movie. A few thoughts, and I’ll try to keep out the spoilers:

  • I loved the anime sequence. I wondered if Tarantino chose to use that purely for the aesthetics, or if he had any other motives for doing so? My husband said he felt it was because the scene was way too bloody to include a real child actress, and I felt that it was because of the scene that followed with her as a child and the Boss (and what’s happening - for those that have seen it). I think that could only have been accepted when done in a style that forces you to remove real people from the scene.

  • I really wondered why Tarantino chose to go to black and white during the House of Blue Leaves scene. I seemed so superfluous. Almost as if he knew this scene was going to be incredibly long and needed something to break up the potential monotony. I felt like it actually took something away from that scene because it made me wonder.

  • Uma Thurman has really ugly feet. Don’t you think? I mean, I love Uma Thurman but…her feet. (This is in no way meant to insult Ms. Thurman.)

  • There seemed to be a very, very noticeable point where the bloodiness went from “wow, this is so bloody it’s almost turning my stomach” to “okay, this level of blood is almost ridiculous.” It seemed to be a very conscious line, though. It almost felt jarring to me, as it Tarantino was trying to, in a very subtle way, step up the level of gore so as to deliberately make it ridiculous, but failed at the subtle part.

  • The opening sequence was great. I felt it was really gripping.

I can’t wait for Volume 2. Unlike another poster in this thread, I didn’t feel the 70’s hipness was too overbearing, and I actually like that (being 31, maybe I kind of identify with it…).

So is Tarantino Puff Daddy? I mean, he samples everyone else’s movies so shamelessly, yet everyone gives him a free pass. I’m curious if he has an original idea, unless his original idea is to only ripoff the most obscure films imaginable. Film geeks go ga-ga for him because they “get” the obscurity, but yeesh.

I liked parts of Kill Bill, but overall, splitting it had to hurt it, particularly if Part II actually makes me care about anyone. Well, that’s not true, I cared about Sonny Chiba’s character.

To answer Caryn’s question about the anime, I suspect it did make the final scene avoid an NC-17, but the real reason it’s that way is probably because, you know, Tarantino thinks anime is cool, just like he thinks arterial spray is cool, and swords are cool, cars with “Pussy Wagon” are cool… this entire movie is a series of bits of what Quentin Tarantino thinks is cool. Which is fine if all you look for in movies is references to every cool and ironic pop-culture reference. Even the openening “Our Feature Presentation” and the “Shaw Scope” thing was “cool.”

As was noted, making the narrative jump around seemed to be done just because, not because it actually added anything.

I’m not sure that’s the case – I think the narrative jump was a necessity once the movie was split into 2 pieces, since it was obviously much more “climatic” to end with the fight with Lucy L.

I also think, in hindsight, that splitting it was the right decision (unless severely chopping it was an option) – there’s definitely blood/action fatigue after the Japanese scenes – going on to three more revenge sequences would have just seemed redundant and, I dunno, draining.

I liked it, but do think it’s Tarantino’s worst movie. I guess I prefer more grounded action movies – I just kinda zone out when things get so fantastical/cartoonish, although the movie had some great visual scenes and use of music, which kept pulling me back in.

That’s true; I’d be curious to know if the jumps were there in the original edit. And yeah, I wouldn’t have wanted to sit through that movie for three hours. I actually paid money to see Bad Boys II, and it was 2 1/2 hours of my life I’ll never have back. That was an awful, awful movie–and no way is Kill Bill awful–but it was punishing to have constant action for that long. I was already zoning out during the final fight in Kill Bill.

although the movie had some great visual scenes and use of music, which kept pulling me back in.

Yeah, the music was pretty terrific; that’s actually where Tarantino’s love of “cool” works. Loved the use of that awful “Music Box Dancer” song.

  • I really wondered why Tarantino chose to go to black and white during the House of Blue Leaves scene. I seemed so superfluous. Almost as if he knew this scene was going to be incredibly long and needed something to break up the potential monotony. I felt like it actually took something away from that scene because it made me wonder.

The black and white was used to avoid an NC-17. This isn’t anything new. Scorcese was forced to desaturate the blood at the end of Taxi Driver to avoid an X at the time.

Some international versions of Kill Bill (like the Japanese version) will have the finale in full color. The original trailer also shows some of the shots from the finale in full color.

Its interesting to note that Tarantino seemed prepared to make this move all along. Supposedly the original script says that the “color pops off of the film” at this point.

I think Tarantino’s become like Tom Clancy. He’s so successful that it’s impossible for his producers (or publishers, in Clancy’s case) to edit him down. So what could have been a tight, exciting production at half the length just becomes numbing through repetition.

Thinking back, there really were a lot of little bits of Kill Bill that I liked. I like the schoolgirl with the flail. I loved the anime sequence. I liked everything with Buck, including his fate and his truck. I liked what Uma did to Sophie. But all those little bits didn’t feel like they fit together in one movie, and when they were all assembled together… well, again I found it hard to care.