Major selling points of southern England?

So, this weekend Im to pitch my take on where the extended family and I are to go on vacation this year, and I really want to go to southern England. Never been to england at all despite living so close, and the southern parts are warm enough I can get the rest to come along. Thats the plan, always. so, I shall give a presentation and was wondering if Anyone knew the area well enough to give me some idea on what the major selling point of it is? for reference, the family is facts and historically intetested so Thats a great thing in this regard.
Thanks in advance and apologies for formatting, wrote this in the bus on my phone.

It’s not northern England.

Damn it, you took my joke!

The M25 is the world’s longest road - if you can get from the start to the end in one trip you actually get given a small certificate.

Kentish ale is quite good.

Yes… get yourself to the Cock at St Albans and try the Bishop’s Finger.

REPORTED

Stonehenge

Where the demons dwell!

warm, but often as wet as the rest. Take umbrella’s, raincoats and if you are serious on the history stuff, some wellington boots as well (as all the mud and grass around those castles gets pretty messy).

A couple of websites you might find handy:

http://www.castlexplorer.co.uk/index.php

My own personal recommendations of places i’d visit first in the south (if doing it as a first time):

The Cotswolds: http://www.cotswolds.info/

The New Forrest: http://www.thenewforest.co.uk/

Bath (and it’s roman baths): http://www.romanbaths.co.uk/

Lizard Point, Cornwall: Lizard Point, Cornwall - Wikipedia

All that is more or less a south-east to south-west ‘tour’, around which you can fit whatever takes your fancy from the sites i linked above (Castles, Historic sites etc). This country drips history from it’s pores, even living here there is so much i can never visit it all. So you won’t have a hard time finding places to visit and things to see. Just remember your wet weather gear!

And the banshees live, and they do live well!

The other day I met this guy from the South. You could tell he was from the South 'cos he had a fucking job. -Ben Elton

I live there :)

me too! (near stonehenge! as it happens).

what sort of history do you want? old buildings? museums? we are probably one of best destinations on the planet in both cases.

I’m not sure I can use that as a Major Selling Point with my family ;-)

Thanks Zak - I didn’t know it was that bad with the rain? we’re going in Early July next year - Is that a bad time as well? If so, I doubt I can sell the idea.

me too! (near stonehenge! as it happens).

what sort of history do you want? old buildings? museums? we are probably one of best destinations on the planet in both cases.

We love all things that have to do with History - Both museums(That are interesting) and various sites. Personally, I love old Castles and the like but anything that has had impact on the country in the past is something we enjoy visiting.

In France we vsitied Saint Mont Michell which was part of the legacy of William, Duke of Normandy. I’m told there is one like it somewhere in Southern England - Stuff like that is awesome!

It’s the uk, we are ruled by the gods of weather. It’s why we brits have that reputation of loving to talk about the weather so much, it is part of our dna. Even IF you get lucky and hit a sunny spell (which does happen), the rain gods are never far away and it is just a good rule of thumb to come here prepared for wet weather. So even in ‘summer’ (did anyone tell you about this summer gone?), bring your rain coats. This is britain, we have crap weather most of the time. I’m not being dramatic, just don’t want you, or other new visitors, to get a nasty surprise.

The upside of all that bad weather kind of culminated in a ‘british empire’ (if you can call that an upside!), as you had a country of people that famously hate each other (scots/english/welsh/irish/cornish on the obvious end to north/south/maccums vs geordies etc (there is a lot of etc!) on the less obvious end) and could take that ‘hate’ and export it against other nations we absorbed into the empire. All that anger probably comes from the bad weather, that’s my theory (which is why annoying a Scot is never a good idea, they have the worst weather in general in the uk).

Also all the bad weather meant lots of excuses for the upper classes to stay indoors tinkering with inventions and reading books, which is where the industrial revolution came from, which kind of kick-started the modern world.

So i hope you have a small glimpse of the depth and breadth that ‘weather’ plays in britain. All this is just to help you expect the ‘worst’ during you visit, and to bring wet weather gear. You may strike it lucky and only see blue skies, but you most likely will get some of the traditional stuff too. I find it makes the historic sites even more atmospheric personally, nothing quite like Stonehenge on a foggy damp early morning with the rising sun slowly pushing the fog bank away to reveal all those massive hand placed blocks of stone (that came from another very wet region of the uk, wales).

Should i work for the uk tourist board? Maybe not.

So even in ‘summer’ (did anyone tell you about this summer gone?), bring your rain coats. This is britain, we have crap weather most of the time.

Seriously. It rained basically every day for three whole months this summer. That was extreme, to be fair, but the point is it can and will rain on any day of the year.

As for the upsides, I’d suggest having a look through Zak’s links, especially on the historical stuff. The National Trust is great and a bunch of castles and stately homes are open to the public. I wouldn’t go out of your way for Stonehenge, as it’s pretty underwhelming in its modern context and fenced off . You’re probably better off going to Avebury. On the plus side (sort of) Stonehenge is right next to the motorway, so if you’re travelling out west you won’t have to go out of your way.

Depending on your definition of southern England, you’ll probably want to check out Oxford and Bristol (Clifton suspension bridge especially, but also plenty of maritime stuff). Hampton Court just south of London is very touristy but there’s a reason for that. If you’re based in London it’s definitely worth a day-trip. Leeds Castle (in Kent, not Leeds) is also close by. Other castles on the south coast, though not as near London, are Tintagel (very much in ruins, but spectacularly located on the cliffside), Arundel and Corfe. If you decide to spend a lot of time in the west, Caernarvon is probably the most structurally impressive castle in the UK.

In France we vsitied Saint Mont Michell which was part of the legacy of William, Duke of Normandy. I’m told there is one like it somewhere in Southern England - Stuff like that is awesome!

There is, confusingly also called Saint Michael’s Mount. It’s in Cornwall (far south west).

And, it goes without saying that there’s tons of amazing stuff to see and do in London - more than enough for a holiday on its own. Though it is very easy to get ripped off as a tourist.

Southeast may be the driest and warmest part of England, and the white cliffs are pretty cool, but I like the Cornwall-Devon-Cotswalds stretch of country the best. The fields and towns are smaller and more quaint, the coast is spectacular and the moors are eerie. Southeast seems a little less manicured, a little more vast, a little more boring.

Yeah, I’d agree in general about the south west being a better tourist destination (excluding London). There’s some good stuff in the south east but there’s a lot more in the south west and the landscape is generally more dramatic. That said, there’s some good walking to be had in the South Downs.

“London” is a great answer to what to do with many days in England. It’ll take days just to get around the British museum because the good news about London is that, if you’re worn out on looking at English stuff, we spent a couple hundred years stealing everyone else’s stuff, so there’s a lot of flavour.

I like the New Forest region, would recommend Bath and, if you’re the King of Denmark then I’d suggest you take the parrot off your head and go stay at somewhere like Ston Easton - the food is almost as ridiculously good as the prices are ridiculously ridiculous.

Joking about the Cock and the Bishop’s Finger aside, I’d also give St Albans a try. There’s Roman wall down by the lake, a Roman mosaic, Eleanor’s Cross is in the middle of town and it’s a level in Fatshark’s new War of the Roses game. Although I don’t think you’re allowed to take a crossbow onto town centre rooftops in real life. Plus the Cock and the Fighting Cock down by the lake do a good range of English ales and ciders. Also you can get a passable Cornish Pasty without going all the way to Cornwall.