Marvel 1602

OK, sure, yes, point taken. On the other hand, when you have somebody (like our friend extarbags here) who seems to already like comics, why wouldn’t he be interested in reading what is easily the most critically-acclaimed comic of all time? If one or two people recommend something, that’s one thing, but this is Watchmen, for God’s sake. It’s one of the few things comics geeks actually agree on.

On the, er, other other hand, I sorta get where extarbags is coming from. When things are wildly praised, I tend to get somewhat contrarian, because if all these idiots like it, then how good could it be?

By the way, anyone on this thread who hasn’t seen at least one film by Yasujiro Ozu, is an idiot.

Since we’re going that way, I’d also like to add the films of Preston Sturges, the games of Tim Shaffer, and the “Funhouse” album by The Stooges.

Very?
Universal praise without a hint of a well thought-out contrary opinion is probably a good indicator of the subject being very very good.

Unless of course, you wanna get all post-modern and slag off things like Dante’s Inferno because it was far ahead of its time and annoying the people in power.

[quote]
By the way, anyone on this thread who hasn’t seen at least one film by Yasujiro Ozu, is an idiot.

Since we’re going that way, I’d also like to add the films of Preston Sturges, the games of Tim Shaffer, and the “Funhouse” album by The Stooges.[/quote]

And the films of Jacques Tati, the books of Kurt Vonnegut and the music of Rickard Wagner, if we’re playing this game…

[quote=“Equis”]

Very?
Universal praise without a hint of a well thought-out contrary opinion is probably a good indicator of the subject being very very good.[/quote]

Well, yes. Usually, if something is universally praised, then we have a strong indication that it is good. And usually I end up coming around on those things worthy of universal praise - I remember being a hold-out on the music of the Beatles when I was a young snotty punk simply because I thought “Sgt. Pepper” was over-rated (which I still do, actually - gimme “Revolver” or “Abbey Road” anyday). Clearly I was being an idiot, as the Beatles are obviously great, but like extarbags I was tired of everybody telling me how great they were.

The irony, of course, is that Alan Moore is probably 1/1000th as well known as any film star. He’s known in comic circles, but those are pretty small circles.

And Alan Moore isn’t just popular. His work in the 80s defined what comics have been since then. He really opened the door for comics to handle mature, deeper themes, and showed how it could be done without sacrificing the bombast and the superheroic attitude.

Not experiencing his comics is a willful act of ignorance. You’re going to kick yourself later, which is why we’re kicking you now.

The other thing is, if you hate the derivative versions made of his works, well so does he. And not just in a “I’m a cool hipster who hates my derivative works” kind of way, but to the point of actually fucking with the powers that be over their abuse.

I didn’t like 1602 too much. The concept sounded cool, but when I sat down to read the book, it just didn’t click.