Minority Report

I was actually really impressed. Excellent movie, and Tom Cruise isn’t too annoying, either. (No spoilers for now, until people have had a chance to see it. :D )

I’m curious to hear what other people thought of it.

It was Rubbish

Next!

Anybody besides Captain Negativity here going to weigh in on this one?

I saw it, thought it was great until the last 30 minutes or so. The ending wasn’t as bad as AI, but it was lacking. Overall, I really enjoyed the flick though, and I’d recommend seeing it. I too will refrain from discussing the plot until more have seen it.

I just got back and I’m a little dissapointed.

I won’t dive into the spoilers tonight. It just feels like the last 30 minutes or so was a total misstep. It’s an OK movie, but it coulda been a great movie.

It was an ok movie with way too much exposition. I guess that was so there was no danger anyone (even really stupid people) would get even a little confused. It drove me nuts. Instead of writing a good screenplay, just have the characters explain the action every step of the way! The ending was dumb, and the final scenes were as bad as the very end of The Wonder Boys. Interesting story (Dick’s), ham-handed direction (Spielberg’s), and some good special effects. Not worth $8.50 and two hours.

Yep, the damn exposition was a big part of what bothered me about the ending. But no wonder they wanted it all spelled out. It was so stupid. I haven’t read Dick’s story, but I bet the movie was true to it all the way up to the dumb ending.

Tim,
I haven’t seen the film or read the story but I doubt there’s ever been a Phillip Dick story remotely followed by the movie. They tend to take the hook and build the movie from there. Anyway, Dick probably didn’t have Dick to do with the ending. In fact, over-exposition is something Speilberg just sort of does.

Do Androids Dream of Electronic Sheep? = Blade Runner
We’ll Remember it for you Wholesale = Total Recall
and I think AI was one as well, maybe not, can’t remember. Something about __ Toys Last Forever.

Anyway, all examples are thin short stories that mainly flesh out a really cool idea and a movie gets made around that idea. Another example of this is Stephen King’s Running Man and the film. Not very similar stories at all, in fact, given today’s Reality Gameshow deal I’m shocked nobody has made a version of The Running Man that followed King’s story.
(In the book the involuntary gameshow contestant runs across America pursued by bounty hunters (who aren’t in the WWE) and hounded by citizens calling in sightings)

AI was based on a short story by Brian Aldiss, not Philip K. Dick.

AI was based on a short story by Brian Aldiss, not Philip K. Dick.

And the title was Super-toys Last All Summer Long, to answer that previous question.

I agree that the ending is easily the worst part of the movie (both leading up to, and the very finish), but I guess I’m more willing to forgive that. Or maybe it’s just my surprise at seeing something actually watchable in a theatre…

You are forgetting Dick’s “Second Variety” which was made into the pretty awful “Screamers.”

The fact that Spielberg is prone to over-exposition doesn’t excuse that flaw in this movie, or in any of his movies.

I didn’t really think this film was “watchable.”

Bub,

It was a great concept, and even a great movie, with excellent Sfx, and cool ideas about the future. It’s just like the last half hour they gave up (gave in?) and just went with the most dreadful choices. I was really excited half way through thinking it was going to be great. I was really let down when it ended. Kind of like Training Day.

Also, I believe that should have been “Dick didn’t have dick to do with it,” but it’s a small matter. :)

Just weighing in on Minority Report to say, “Not a fan”.

One of my favorite pointless exposition lines: “After six years, the precrime project was shut down and all the people who had been imprisoned were released. But local police kept a close eye on them anyway.”

I liked the jetpack sequence, but could have done without the other hour and fifty five minutes. I officially give up on Spielberg.

 -Tom

To preempt Wumpus: Rotten Tomatoes has a whopping 93% rating, which is pretty incredible for a sci-fi movie. They always divide critics (or get outright panned). And the “Cream of the Crop” (nationally syndicated critics or something) have a 100% positive rating.

[/i]

I thought it was overall quite good, and worth seeing. But there WAS too much exposition. In a thriller like this, you’re not supposed to give the audience time to figure out who’s doing what until they see it at the very end. The movie gives us too much time to think, and then it starts to break apart. If it was 100 minutes long, we’d all be so caught up in the moment that we wouldn’t notice the seams showing.

SPOILER ALERT!!

The climax was okay, but the resolution at the end was dumb. Why feel the need to wrap up every question the audience might have? I’d have enjoyed it more not knowing if Anderton gets back together with his wife (let alone has another kid) and it’s better if we wonder whether or not Precrime continues.

There were a lot of things I DID like, though. I like they cynical view that every available public surface will be used for targeted advertising. :D Visually, it’s a very tight movie that doesn’t overdo it with the special effects. At least not so you’d notice.

My main beef, though, is that it didn’t actually move me. I was intellectually interested all along, even entertained, but I never laughed, or was scared, or sad. The characters were kind of flat that way…

Except the old woman who was working in her greenhouse (forget her name). She had GREAT lines and delivered them with a wonderful matter-of-fact tone. Her stupid moving plants were bullshit, though. What, do they have some kind of muscle tissue or something? It’s just rediculous, unneeded special effects that ruined my suspense of disbelief.

I don’t want to sound too negative, because it’s pretty entertaining and I think it’s worth the money/time. It’s just not so good as to warrant the critical praise it’s getting. It’s a B+.

One word (two, actually): Blade Runner.

I liked it overall. The ending was to “nice and neat”, but the general story was good, and the acting well done. The commercialism shown was funny. Talk about in your face.

minor spoiler:

The part about how he does the muder and usis the ‘pre-cogs’ to cover it up was pretty neat.

What was “neat” about it? It was just a plot device, and not a particularly interesting one at that.

The other thing that really bothered me was how the movie couldn’t even bother to be internally consistent. See below, but be warned:

MAJOR SPOILERS
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
MAJOR SPOILERS (you’ve been warned)
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

  1. The Precrime officers state that they are only getting crimes of passion (“red balls”) these days because they have been so effective in wiping out crime that no one premeditates murder anymore. Yet the “murder” of Leo Crow by Anderton is a brown ball (premeditated) even though Anderton has absolutely no idea who he is going to kill, and doesn’t even know who Crow is until moments before he is supposed to kill him.

  2. The pre-cogs aren’t supposed to be able to see rape, kidnapping, etc. because only murder is violent enough to create a rip in the cosmic fabric, or whatever stupid metaphor the movie thought up (I don’t recall exactly). But when Angela and Anderton are being chased, she repeatedly visualizes the most trivial, irrelevant events, like the guy walking by with a bunch of balloons, or it starting to rain outside. But she can’t see rapes.

The “alternate future” vision she had in the house (“this house is so fuuuull of loooove”) was beyond awful. How could anyone like this movie? And how can it be called “tight” with all that ridiculous exposition? As Tom Chick pointed out: “Don’t worry, everyone, everybody lived happily ever after! They even freed the prisoners BUT THEY KEPT AN EYE ON THEM SO THEY WOULDN’T HURT ANYBODY!!!”

SPOILERS

  1. The Precrime officers state that they are only getting crimes of passion (“red balls”) these days because they have been so effective in wiping out crime that no one premeditates murder anymore. Yet the “murder” of Leo Crow by Anderton is a brown ball (premeditated) even though Anderton has absolutely no idea who he is going to kill, and doesn’t even know who Crow is until moments before he is supposed to kill him.

This is my main beef with the movie as well. The only reason I could think of is if it was due to Cruise’s character devoting his life to stopping crime and killing the man responsible for his son’s death. Even that would not have been plausible. The Precogs should have picked it up from him the first time they went on line. To me that’s was just too much of a gap in logic for a supposedly smart movie to have, it magnified all the little ones such as the car plant that automatically opens the factory doors once a car rolls off the line (full of gas as well!).