Networking (corporate) questions to network admins

We’re having some weird network issues at work, and as it’s a small start-up company, don’t currently have a network admin. Maybe some of you have tackled similar issues.

1.) Our server is allowing us to double-book an IP address. It works for about fifteen seconds, but then gives a “conflicting IP address” error message. If I assign a static IP to one of the computers, IE (which is the main thing we’re trying to get to work) no longer works. (Didn’t try pinging the gateway…Mental note to do that tomorrow.)

2.) We’re running 2 separate networks, with 2 separate routers (one for internet, that only some computers have, and one for one of the programs we have to run), and we’d like to merge them into one network. If I just daisy-chain the routers, will that cause problems? I don’t know what it’ll do if I have two routers, but I want all computers to be able to access both gateways.

Any help would be great.

Hmm… A few questions:

  1. what device/OS is assigning your IP addresses? Do you have multiple devices assigning addresses in the same range?
  2. when you assign a static address, what are you putting in for the DNS information? (if DHCP isn’t pulling the DNS, that’s probably why you’re having problems – try connecting directly to an IP address and see if that works for you).

2.) We’re running 2 separate networks, with 2 separate routers (one for internet, that only some computers have, and one for one of the programs we have to run), and we’d like to merge them into one network. If I just daisy-chain the routers, will that cause problems? I don’t know what it’ll do if I have two routers, but I want all computers to be able to access both gateways.

Any help would be great.

The ease with which you can accomplish this depends largely on what hardware you’ve got and what exactly you’re trying to accomplish. Post more details! ;)

Yeah, I figured you’d say that. I don’t have hardware details on the routers at this point – I’ll post them once I have them, though.

As for the other – that might be the problem. I can’t remember what all I fiddled with, or what I didn’t touch. I might have forgotten the DNS – which would be a problem. I look into that, and see if it helps. Thanks!

Daisy chaining routers is basicly the principal behind the Internet, so in theory it should work. :)

Uplink one of the routers to the other. You should probably uplink the closed network router into the internet router, but there’s not going to be any easier way no matter which way you do it. If you don’t have a designated uplink port in the routers, try the first or last port, since those are almost always the uplink port if it doesn’t have a specifically designated one.

Otherwise, just daisy-chain it and play around. You’ll have to deny the non-internet computers access to the wide open world, of course, but that won’t be hard.

Before you do any of this, just make sure the dilithium crystals are charged to FULL or you run the risk of warping the deflector shield grid when you hit the upload button. Good luck!

Hey, Murph’s the one who openly admitted that he doesn’t have enough power to get her goin’, Tim. Not my fault the man can’t charge the dilithium crystals to full.

(Murph & Murph’s wife: You guys know I have nothing but love for you. I just couldn’t resist making a bad joke when Tim did)

i don’t know what your isolated network was used for, but if it’s sensative enough that it was isolated (rather than just being a bunch of computers that weren’t networked for other reasons) you might want to put a second firewall between the first network and the second (you do have a firewall between the first network and the internet, right?)

Of course we do.

It’s not as much an issue of sensitivity, I don’t think, so much as the fact that one guy set up our initial network, and then somebody else, who didn’t really know what he was doing, set up the internet network just recently. (I don’t really know what I’m doing, obviously…but I know how to find out.) We run a program that has to hit a gateway (on the initial network) that then connects to a database off-site. Then we have the internet network. It’s very messy, and we’d like to integrate it so that any computer on either network (which will soon, hopefully, be one big network) can hit either the gateway to our program, or the internet. That should be possible, shouldn’t it?

They’re both Cisco 2160 routers, if that helps.

Oh, and I got the IP conflict straightened out, since I know you’ve all been losing sleep over it.

Good for you! What was the problem there?

As for the dual routers, explain again the reason you need two? I have always found that the simplest plans are the best. If you’ve got two networks but only need/want one, consider moving everyone to the one network that is connected to the internet and then just shut down the other network.

Are you saying you’d like some tips about how to manage that? How many computers are we talking about on each network?

<nod>

I can’t see any reason why it wouldn’t work.

If you don’t mind me asking, what was the problem with the double-booking of ips?