Northern Ireland 1, England nil

That is all.

Well, link for funsies.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/internationals/4212920.stm

That’s one of the better things about people in the US not caring about soccer. We can tie 0-0 away at Guatemala and no one would care.

Frankly, I think England’s loss to France in Euro '04 is actually worse but that’s just me. Finland drew 0-0 at Andorra last week. It’s not the end of the world for England.

Suffice it to say they really need to win the next two games.

— Alan

Or beat Mexico 2-0 at home, for that matter . . .

Funny, funny, funny. It took me 50 odd minutes to start cheering on Northern Ireland instead of England. The Second he took Sean Wright-Phillips off, our one creative outlet during the entire match, quickly followed by Gerrard and Lampard, I was convinced Northern Ireland was going to win it.

They deserved it and the tabloid reaction from rags like the S*n will be hilarious.

Replacing Cole, you know the guy who scored your only goal against Wales last week, with the returned Owens was pretty dumb too.

— Alan

Or beat Mexico 2-0 at home, for that matter . . .[/quote]

I read an article a few weeks ago with suggestions to make soccer more comprehensible and interesting to the typical, ignorant American sports fan like me. Two of the suggestions seemed to make sense:

  1. Get rid of that offsides rule. It’s only purpose seems to be insert a lot of tedious pauses in the action. Of course, I’m probably missing something vital in the game here, but I can understand the offsides rules in hockey and American football, but no matter how many times the soccer rule is explained, I still don’t get.

  2. Keep the official time on the stadium and TV clocks, just like every other timed sport in the world. What is the fucking purpose of keeping the actual game time a secret? A love of surprise endings?

It’s to keep teams from just putting an attacker in the opposing penalty box the entire game, waiting for a stray boll.

  1. Keep the official time on the stadium and TV clocks, just like every other timed sport in the world. What is the fucking purpose of keeping the actual game time a secret? A love of surprise endings?

I don’t know about your tv, but tv broadcasts here show the match clock every 5-10 minutes or so. Extra time is announced a couple of minutes before the half ends but the decision to end a half is up to the referee so it’s not exact to the second. It’s 45 minute halfs we’re talking about, people don’t need to see the clock all the time. As for stadium clocks, I believe they do show the time, but I haven’t been to a football match in over a decade so I’m not sure.

Yes, to prevent cherry-picking. It can be a difficult rule to implement properly but soccer would be much different without it, and I think much worse.

As far as stray bolls go, if it was Heinrich and not Uwe, that would be ok.

As for stadium clocks, I believe they do show the time, but I haven’t been to a football match in over a decade so I’m not sure.

They do show the time, right on the stadium clock (as well as on TV). I don’t know where this guy got his ideas for suggestions but he must not have watched any soccer to come up with them.

Dr Fear- They show the stoppage time? Not in the handful of soccer games I’ve watched.
But showing stoppage time is a half solution. Get rid of the concept. Stop the clock like every other timed sport.

So whatever happened to Norman Whiteside?? :lol:

Or beat Mexico 2-0 at home, for that matter . . .[/quote]

I read an article a few weeks ago with suggestions to make soccer more comprehensible and interesting to the typical, ignorant American sports fan like me. Two of the suggestions seemed to make sense:

  1. Get rid of that offsides rule. It’s only purpose seems to be insert a lot of tedious pauses in the action. Of course, I’m probably missing something vital in the game here, but I can understand the offsides rules in hockey and American football, but no matter how many times the soccer rule is explained, I still don’t get.

2?[/quote]

It’s pretty much the same as hockey,but the redline moves to stay even with the last defender(excluding the GK). Although under the latest interpetation,it’s only blown when the attacker past the line touches the ball, not when the pass is made like hockey.

What’s wrong with stoppage time? It’s just time that would have been wasted already during the regular allotted time (roughly). Doesn’t make sense to have in-time game time reduced for non-game activity.

Of course, you could always stop the clock… I suppose this way is actually easier.

In any event, I don’t think the display or non-display of the clock and stoppage time is a major hindrance to the enjoyment of the game.

— Alan

I read an article a few weeks ago with suggestions to make soccer more comprehensible and interesting to the typical, ignorant American sports fan like me. Two of the suggestions seemed to make sense:

  1. Get rid of that offsides rule. It’s only purpose seems to be insert a lot of tedious pauses in the action. Of course, I’m probably missing something vital in the game here, but I can understand the offsides rules in hockey and American football, but no matter how many times the soccer rule is explained, I still don’t get.

  2. Keep the official time on the stadium and TV clocks, just like every other timed sport in the world. What is the fucking purpose of keeping the actual game time a secret? A love of surprise endings?

Although the Offside rule is a constant source of amusement, it does serve a practical purpose as noted above. Without it, there’s nothing to stop you leaving a man in the opposing penalty area and reducing the game to pretty much taking it in turns lobbing a ball over the defence to him.

Fundamentally the rule is simple. If a player is behind the last defender when the ball is played to them, they are offside. However, FIFA is doing its best to complicate this as much as possible with un-necessary caveats regarding whether the player can be considered active in a move etc.

UK tv, with the exception of highlight programmes, always have the clock onscreen and the amount of extra time to be added at the end of each half is always prominently displayed by the 4th Official.

Given that American football makes sense to you lot, I’m suprised that football can be considered a difficult sport to understand ;)

But is there any coherent reason why soccer couldn’t just put an offsides line on the field, like hockey does with the blue lines? Why wouldn’t that work? The current rule is extremely goofy and allows way too much referee interpretation.

How would an offside line work? You can’t ever pass to a player who is behind the line?

The “line” does exist, its the defense, its just fluid in that typically the defense in a football team works as a unit, hence tactical options like the Offside trap where the entire defensive line moves forward at once to “trap” the offensive player in an offside situation. It requires skill, teamwork and timing to work. Likewise an Attacker has to stay sharp regarding the position of the defence and timing his run.

The current rule is extremely goofy and allows way too much referee interpretation.

In some respects that is part of the fun of it. It’s a simple rule, but does require the Linesmen/referee to be sharp when it comes to ruling a move as offside or not.

I can’t even begin to analyze the effects of such a rule, but it seems that it would be a very radical change to the way defense plays for no real benefit. The offside rule is a bit wonky and prone to referee mistakes at times, but it works and it is what people are used to playing.

And it would kill a standard British running joke that women are incapable of understanding the offside rule which is why they don’t like football.

Women and Americans. :wink:

Budweiser’s Premierleague ad

Soccertainment! Horrible beer, but they’ve got a sense of humour.

Monstertrucks and multiballs? Soccertainment sounds good to me!