PC Gone Awry: Nashville Suspends Honor Rolls

This Washington Post article reports that Nashville schools have suspended honor rolls “after a few parents complained that their children might be ridiculed for not making the list” Instead, we should all celebrate mediocrity.

Great, I can’t wait for the day a kid’s parents have to sign a disclosure agreement so that his name can be called out for attendance check.

While I don’t think this is always the best solution, in this case I feel that maybe those students should work harder. In my high school, being on the honor roll meant you got a few extra privileges and I don’t think that kind of stuff should be taken away.

And there’s always the “My Child Beat Up Your Honor Student” bumper stickers to live up to.

Gasp! PC went awry??? It’s the apocalypse!

All kidding aside, I hate PC’s touchy-feely-everyone’s-above-average-self-esteem-matters-more-than-anything attitude, and news items like this will eventually swing the pendulum back the other way.

Harrison Bergeron? Is that you?

Err, did anyone read the article?

As a result, all Nashville schools have stopped posting honor rolls, and some are also considering a ban on hanging good work in the hallways – on the advice of school lawyers.

After a few parents complained that their children might be ridiculed for not making the list, lawyers for the Nashville school system warned that state privacy laws forbid releasing any academic information, good or bad, without permission.

Blame it on unintended side effects of a law, not this mythical PC thing.

The problem appears unique to Tennessee, because most states follow federal student privacy guidelines, which allow the release of such things as honor rolls, U.S. Department of Education officials said. “It’s the first time I’ve heard of schools doing that,” said department spokesman Jim Bradshaw.

But Nashville school lawyers based their decision last month on a state privacy law dating to 1970 – a law that is not always followed because no one challenged the honor-roll status quo.

Parent’s complaining started the whole process in motion, Jason. I still think the PC thing applies.

This is ignorant. Hey, let’s do away with grades too! Make school pass or fail. No, that won’t work either - some kids will be upset if they fail. Ok, everyone passes and all the widdle sensitive kids can be happy! :roll:

(While we’re on the subject: I have had the opportunity to visit many nations over the years and I must say that American parents are the most overprotective, coddling, whining people I’ve come across anywhere.)

Give me a break, they say they stopped it because of Tennessee’s 1970s privacy law. That they noticed it violated the law because of couple of idiiots complained on completely unrelated grounds doesn’t mean anything; they give no indication at all that they’d have stopped honor rolls based strictly on the couple of complaints.

School officials are developing permission slips to give parents of the Nashville district’s 69,000 students the option of having their children’s work recognized. They hope to get clearance before the next grading cycle – in about six weeks at some schools.

Sounds PC to me! Christ.

So if, say, a kid with a 89.9% didn’t get on the honor roll, and his parents complained, and then they noticed they’re violating the privacy laws and have to do away with it - it’d really all be the fault of the kid with the 89.9%?

From your own quote:

After a few parents complained that their children might be ridiculed for not making the list

Had these idiots not complained, it never would have been an issue.

[size=2]Good lord, man, join a debate team and get this out of your system. :)[/size]

Give me a break, they say they stopped it because of Tennessee’s 1970s privacy law.[/quote]

If a bunch of whiny parents hadn’t complained, said law would never have been looked up, much less enforced. You’re missing your own points here, Jason…

So stupid laws are the fault of the people who accidentally bring them to the attention of others?

And why would the non-honour students be picked on. I seem to recall from my highschool daze that it was the “braniacs” who got picked on (he says as he pushes his taped up glasses higher on his nose).

Most states have any number of unenforced, ridiculous laws on their books that were passed by moronic legislatures in a fit of overzealousness. These laws are the faults of the idiots who initially passed them, but executive branches tend to intentionally ignore them unless they have no choice–like when whiny parents in Tennessee cause a ruckus, for example. Or when fundamentalist prosecutors decide to go after sodomy violations. Etc.

Therefore, blame belongs with both the promulgators of the dumb law and the idiots who cause it to be enforced again.

If Rywill were here, he’d point out that just because the law is stupid is no reason to ignore it, and that the law needs to be amended by the legislature.

Which it probably will be.

Right. They “caused” it to be enforced. Jeez.

Exactly right. The folks in Tennessee who discovered this piece of legislation, the school boards, and the Department of Education weren’t intentional law breakers, now were they? They had no idea that it existed, and that it mandated the elimination of the honor roll. The complaining parents quite literally caused it to be enforced.

Jeeze. Did you turn off your brain today?

Heh. I happen to disagree with that. I think a stupid law should be ignored or, better yet, intentionally disobeyed so that a test case goes through the courts or society changes. Advocates of civil disobediance like, say, MLK jr or Gandhi were both big fans of that approach, you know.

Heh. I happen to disagree with that. I think a stupid law should be ignored or, better yet, intentionally disobeyed so that a test case goes through the courts or society changes. Advocates of civil disobediance like, say, MLK jr or Gandhi were both big fans of that approach, you know.[/quote]

Hey, I agree with you, but I’m just saying what the lawyer said in another thread when Jason brought up a “bad law”.

However, this isn’t an individual person flaunting a stupid law. This is a whole school system and an agency of the state. It makes perfect sense for the state to follow the state’s laws.

Yup, the state has no choice, now that an issue has been made of it. With luck, the legislature will take action to correct a decades-old mistake.