Red Cross forbid from entering New Orleans

When you’re the one pulling out and highlighting absurd examples out of poorly written news pieces? And your response to being called on isn’t to admit your hyperbolic declaration of total failure was way over the top, but to pile it on even higher without making any informative statements or references whatsoever.

It’s not a cheap shot to observe that you don’t seem interested in backing up your strong opinion with anything of meaningful value.

So, do you have anything to say about FEMA’s decision to kill as many residents as possible by preventing relief from entering the city?

Do us a favor. Argue for the other side.

Thanks.

-Amanpour

Do us a favour. Avoid the irrelevant pithy comments and discuss the topic.

FEMA denied entry to New Orleans to the relief workers that could have prevented deaths. How is this any different from a third-world tinpot dictator doing exactly the same thing?

When you’re the one pulling out and highlighting absurd examples out of poorly written news pieces?[/quote]

You really don’t know what’s going on do you. The Picayune is trying to report from NO, so lets cut them a little slack.

And your response to being called on isn’t to admit your hyperbolic declaration of total failure was way over the top, but to pile it on even higher without making any informative statements or references whatsoever.

Well that’s my response to you, yes, because I’m seeing tons of evidence that something is very, very wrong here. Not sure why you’ve decided to defend that, or really what your point is beyond “The administration deserves more respect.” Yeah well, go tell it to Pravda comrade.

It’s not a cheap shot to observe that you don’t seem interested in backing up your strong opinion with anything of meaningful value.

You haven’t given me job. I think there’s plenty of evidence already, but as more develops in the next few days I’ll be sure to keep you informed.

Do us a favour. Avoid the irrelevant pithy comments and discuss the topic.

FEMA denied entry to New Orleans to the relief workers that could have prevented deaths. How is this any different from a third-world tinpot dictator doing exactly the same thing?[/quote]

People are shouting “apologist!” and “spin!” left and right on this board and you’re twisting the Red Cross’s words right in this thread. Fuck that bullshit.

Which is more difficult, constantly trucking supplies in through 300 miles of no gas to resupply people in degrading sanitary conditions, or getting the people out to a point that isn’t flooded and has such minor details as electricity, running water and operating gas pumps?

Use your head.

Superdome and the convention center weren’t set up to handle that many people for an extended period of time with no resources. The call FEMA did make was asking the Red Cross to be ready to support the evacuees. Do you think that’s not the right call?

As far as prevention from entering the area, that doesn’t appear to have anything to do with FEMA. The security situation didn’t improve until about 36-48 hours ago. If the Red Cross had tried to go in in the first 72 hours following landfall, they wouldn’t only have been crippled by the rising floodwaters, they’d have been targeted by looters.

There were convoys of aid sitting just outside NO and up the I-10 for days. No one was in control of them, and even if NO did have a security issue it didnt stop them from heading elsewhere in the state. Looters and a complete breakdown of society along 150 miles of wrecked coastline ? I dont think so. There’s whole communities that have had little than a fly over, 1 week on.

Whoever is managing the overall relief efforts, hasnt. Its negligence caused by mis-management and bureaucracy on a level never seen before.

You make a very valid observation, to which I will ask you to do something: contrast the state response in Mississippi versus Louisiana.

Superdome and the convention center weren’t set up to handle that many people for an extended period of time with no resources. The call FEMA did make was asking the Red Cross to be ready to support the evacuees. Do you think that’s not the right call?

I think it’s a bad call when it appears that neither the Superdome nor Covention centre contained any quantity of water let alone food or sanitation. I think it is appalling that it took 3+ days to get start getting supplies there while anecdotal stories about walmart having water trucks turned away, a big navy ship capable of generating 100,000 litres of water a day sitting unused off the coast and the Red Cross being asked not to go in while there was no apparent effort made until this weekend to actually start evacuating people from these places. Not when government distribution, when it finally arrived, largely consisted of dumping water out of a helicopter and taking off again meaning there was no one on the ground effort to make sure it was distributed properly. This ship was sat there since the storm, how come nobody made the leap of imagination to stick a couple of chinooks on the deck, fill them with water and at least make sure the people in these centres had some basic sanitation from the second it was safe to put a helicopter in the sky?

If they were telling the Red Cross not to go in because they were 5 hours away from evacuating the whole place and they could be of more help elsewhere then fair enough. But asking them not to go in and then doing fuck all is just incredulous.

I think it’s funny that Linoleum could fathom a large Red Cross effort being wiped out by looters. Looters like empty stores, not tents full of aid workers.

These reports of shots fired at hospitals and helicopters aside-- way to the side since there’s yet to be anything actually confirmed-- shouldn’t the Red Cross be able to decide whether or not they want to risk an uprising of the thousands of savage, shiftless negros looking to steal something they can trade to another tribe for beer and captured white women? They’re grown-ups, aren’t they?

FEMA had enough presence to keep aid out (and people in), so they could have spared someone to issue a statement that the Red Cross is entering the city against their advisement. But no. They were simply not allowed to go.

FEMA didn’t stop the Red Cross. State authorities kept the Red Cross out. Whoops.

The state’s Homeland Security officials. Which is a federal agency.

The red tape seems to be cleared now, that Lt. General just ripped a reporter a new one when he dared to question it.

While the governor of Mississippi provided a stark contrast to the President of Jefferson Parish, praising the federal government for its response to Mississippi and painting a somewhat rosy picture, word coming out of Mississippi is not all bearing that out. This morning I heard a Mississippi congressman (sorry, don’t know the name, or the title) roundly criticizing the state response as incompetent and saying that the local governments were shouldering the majority of the burden. I think he said something good about the feds, too, or maybe just pleaded with them to make up the slack from the poor state response.

Sorry, I can’t find a link on MSNBC to the interview. So for now this will have to just be hearsay.

There is this link, however, from a story on WLOX-TV in South Miss entitled “Suffering in Mississippi overshadowed by drama in New Orleans”. It’s not extensive research, just a quick cast about for Miss. stories per your request.

http://www.wlox.com/Global/story.asp?S=3804471

Keisha Moran has been living in a tent in a department store parking lot in Bay St. Louis with her boyfriend and three young children since the hurricane struck. She said National Guardsmen have brought her water but no other aid so far, and she was furious that it took Bush several days before he came to see the damage in Mississippi.

“It’s how many days later? How many people are dead?” Moran said.

In a strongly worded editorial, The Sun Herald of Biloxi-Gulfport pleaded for help and questioned why a massive National Guard presence wasn’t already visible.

“We understand that New Orleans also was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, but surely this nation has the resources to rescue both that metropolitan (area) and ours,” the newspaper editorialized, saying survival basics like ice, gasoline and medicine have been too slow to arrive.

“We are not calling on the nation and the state to make life more comfortable in South Mississippi, we are calling on the nation and the state to make life here possible,” the paper wrote.

-Amanpour

Turns out that firefighters were specially trained and shipped in for operation photo op:

ATLANTA - Not long after some 1,000 firefighters sat down for eight hours of training, the whispering began: “What are we doing here?”
As New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin pleaded on national television for firefighters - his own are exhausted after working around the clock for a week - a battalion of highly trained men and women sat idle Sunday in a muggy Sheraton Hotel conference room in Atlanta.
Many of the firefighters, assembled from Utah and throughout the United States by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, thought they were going to be deployed as emergency workers.
Instead, they have learned they are going to be community-relations officers for FEMA, shuffled throughout the Gulf Coast region to disseminate fliers and a phone number: 1-800-621-FEMA.
On Monday, some firefighters stuck in the staging area at the Sheraton peeled off their FEMA-issued shirts and stuffed them in backpacks, saying they refuse to represent the federal agency.

The firefighters, several of whom are from Utah, were told to bring backpacks, sleeping bags, first-aid kits and Meals Ready to Eat. They were told to prepare for “austere conditions.” Many of them came with awkward fire gear and expected to wade in floodwaters, sift through rubble and save lives.
“They’ve got people here who are search-and-rescue certified, paramedics, haz-mat certified,” said a Texas firefighter. “We’re sitting in here having a sexual-harassment class while there are still [victims] in Louisiana who haven’t been contacted yet.”
The firefighter, who has encouraged his superiors back home not to send any more volunteers for now, declined to give his name because FEMA has warned them not to talk to reporters.

Firefighters say they want to brave the heat, the debris-littered roads, the poisonous cottonmouth snakes and fire ants and travel into pockets of Louisiana where many people have yet to receive emergency aid.
But as specific orders began arriving to the firefighters in Atlanta, a team of 50 Monday morning quickly was ushered onto a flight headed for Louisiana. The crew’s first assignment: to stand beside President Bush as he tours devastated areas.

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot motherfucker?