School shooting in Florida


#1348

I think maybe you are? Betsy, is that you?


#1349

Well at least they can go fishing a little more easily after their long day in the classroom, maybe there is a river nearby.


#1350

I like this post so much I feel like I am cheating on my wife.


#1351

I’m for it if they shoot people who don’t wash their hands properly after using the toilet.


#1352

Or who take giant shits and decline to flush the toilet.


#1353

Or somehow manage to shit on the floor or toilet seat instead of the bowl.


#1354

The worst tangent, ever.


#1355


#1356

Thanks for that, needed a laugh today. :)


#1357

I mean, he wasn’t convicted of a crime and the police aren’t required to protect you, so it makes sense.

The thing that sticks out to me is… cops get a $100k a year from pension in Florida? What the fuck?


#1358

They shouldn’t be able to take away his pension unless he was convicted of a crime or some other wrong doing that also leads to the loss of a pension. We can’t even get cops tried for killing people. I don’t see how cowering would make the top of the list.

I’m sorry for their loss, but they’re not thinking this through.

I disagree with the the police not required to protect you though. His role there was exactly that, for protection.If he didn’t do his job, the answer is he should be fired, but he’d already earned his pension.


#1359

I think people here agree with the sentiment, but the law isn’t on our side. Several court cases argue the cop does not have the obligation to protect.


#1360

I don’t mean police in general per say, although in spirit yes. These police officers assigned to actual schools, is that role/job not more narrowly defined? Isn’t their purpose on these campuses largely for security?


#1361

Likely depends on the state or locality. In mine, resource officers are very restricted in how they can carry out their duties. They can respond to an active shooter, but their primary responsibility is actually making their presence known and holding ground until reinforcements arrive. Honestly, I could see the exact situation unfold like it did down in Florida; “secure” a location and hold until help arrives (although I’d imagine they’d at least secure a position INSIDE).


#1362

Hell no. You think police unions are going to put cops in a situation where they’re legally obligated to do more?

Fairly sure security isn’t legally obligated to do anything either. If you’re running security for some place and a dude with a shotgun walks in and you decide it’s time to find a new job, legally you’re mostly in the clear. If you’re a police officer, you’re 100% in the clear since cops can legally eat a sandwich and watch a dude kill you with a power drill and a blowtorch while on duty in the middle of main street if they wanted.


#1363

Yeah I am not sure what the arrangements are.

I’m not talking about security though.

So when the police are assigned to a campus, they’re still real police. This isn’t a security company. They maintain their police status… happens on universities all the time. Like they’re assigned to the campus, real cops. I am assuming the k-12 have a similar set-up, but I am not sure.

Not sure what the arrangement is, but I know they’re assigned so there must be an arrangement of some kind.


#1364

Sure. But police aren’t obligated to do anything. That’s not even remotely in question.


#1365

Well you can italicize all you want. The SRO programs, however, are not national. They’re at the city and school level so… I don’t know how you can know what everyone is doing anymore than I do.


#1366

You’re confusing several issues.

First of all, the primary responsibility of a law enforcement officer is … law enforcement. It’s right there in the name. Their main job is to prevent people from breaking the law and/or arrest those who do. They aren’t personal bodyguards.

In practice, that means that if a police officer fails to protect a member of the general public, the police department is free of liability. That was established by Warren v. District of Columbia.

That doesn’t mean that police officers have no “obligation” to protect the general public. They often do, and if they fail they might very well be fired. It just means that the police department itself is protected from lawsuit.

However, there are certain situations when police departments can be held liable for failure to protect someone. This only occurs in special situations. For example, they can be sued for failing to protect someone in their custody, or possibly a police informant. Does it also apply to a school officer? We’ll find out eventually, as this is currently being litigated.


#1367