Sony screws up!?

I thought this was funny. Don’t know if there’s any corroboration though:
http://www.engadget.com/2006/05/16/sony-throws-party-for-vaios-fakes-blu-ray-demo/

There’s no corroboration because it’s wrong. The guy took a photo of the unit on the left (notice the edge of the table just under the open tray); the unit on the left was supposed to be playing a DVD, for comparison’s sake (as you can see and read here). Evidently our intrepid reporter missed that part. It’s weird they’d be using a writable DVD instead of a retail copy, though – one guess I’ve read is that Sony recompressed the DVD-9 retail version and burned it to a DVD-5 to make it look worse next to the Blu-ray version, which seems probable.

There’s no corroboration because it’s wrong. The guy took a photo of the unit on the left (notice the edge of the table just under the open tray); the unit on the left was supposed to be playing a DVD, for comparison’s sake (as you can see and read here). Evidently our intrepid reporter missed that part.

Lot of these types of stories showing up since E3. People are in such a hurry to bash Sony they’ve taken to publishing every bit of nonsensical chatter that the net floats their way.

A couple of good lawsuits and a few journalists being terminated should quieten things down, methinks.

The worst part of that story is that Endgadget somehow blames their error on Sony not inviting them to the party.

Actually, why the hell is Sony using a DVDR for their DVD? So even if they are looking at the laptop that is supposed to be displaying a DVD and not Blu-Ray, there is still a story here. Sony pirates movies!

Sony is the US distributor for that movie, so I think they have a very explicit permission to copy it. ;)

Yeah, it seems like the hardcore gamer crowd has a real emotional investment in Sony failing. It’s kinda odd.

Chris Woods

Not really. Hardcore gamers have gone through a couple of PSOnes or PS2s by now, and a few of the more extreme ones blame Sony for “killing” Sega.

Nice try there Viral. Linking to a story that’s already been debunked, in order to show you aren’t a shrill for Sony.

Close, but no cigar.

The worst part of the story is that you have absolutely no way of saying which laptop the DVD was in since there are no pictures of the Blu-ray disc that was playing, and you can’t say for sure which one the original source took the picture of.

God forbid engadget or anyone else who posted the story (like me) should take the word of someone who was there and has pictures to prove it.

and of course no one should ask why Sony would have a bootleg ass copy of their own movie, HD or SD eing shown.

That’s gotta break a licensing agreement or two. Whether it’s something trivial like being properly labeled or something heavier like the fact that even if its the SD version it’s most likely compressed and stripped of DRM flags, if someone had kicked over an xbox 360 at Microsoft’s conference and the smae DVD +R came out with Halo 3 hastily scribbled on it, it would seem at least a bit odd.

In unrelated news, consumer electronics companies cover their eject buttons for all future demos.

don’t they usually do that, or at least not let people get close to the demo units.

Looking at the Notebook Review article, yeah, you can tell which one is playing the Blu-ray disc – aside from the clear quality difference in the side-by-side photo (which is admittedly subjective, since you might conclude one version is simply brighter than the other), if you scroll down a bit there’s another picture of the notebook on the right and the subtitles don’t match the DVD version (the letters are skinner and there’s much less aliasing). Of course, the Notebook Review article didn’t really make the rounds until after the Gearlog article appeared.

Looking at the Notebook Review article, yeah, you can tell which one is playing the Blu-ray disc – aside from the quality difference in the side-by-side photo (which is admittedly subjective, since you might conclude one version is simply brighter than the other), if you scroll down a bit there’s another picture of the notebook on the right and the subtitles don’t match the DVD version – the letters are skinner and there’s much less aliasing than even seems possible with DVD subtitles. Of course, the Notebook Review article didn’t really make the rounds until after the Gearlog post appeared.

True, you just can’t see any of that in the pictures of DVD +R, other than that it appears to also have been taken of the laptop on the left side. If it weren’t a burnt copy, there wouldn’t even be the possibility of a question, and without having personally been there, particularly before laptopreview’s pics came out it’s pretty much impossible to know which one the guy opened.

Actually, using the retail version of the DVD doesn’t make much sense if you want to set up a synched demo. Burning a segment of the movie set to loop in an identical manner to you BR demo makes a lot of sense, though. So even the “Somy am are teh pIratZ” complaint is stupid.

? You can’t select dvd chapters anymore? set loop marks in the playback software? Making an edited copy isn’t absolutely necessary.