SuperBowl Commercials: 2015


#41

Yeah, “Call your mom and tell her you love her.”

“My mother died after months in pain suffering from a debilitating disease. Fuck you, McDonalds for making me think of that.”


#42

One I laughed at, not with, that I haven’t seen mentioned is the Always ‘run like a girl’ ad. The idea is reasonable but if someone tells me to ‘run/throw like a girl’ the way the offscreen voice did I would assume they are looking for the bad stereotype not a real answer. Like setting up a joke. Which I guess was maybe the point. But then the little girls come on a run fast like any kid would and go against stereotype. Next the real girls show their throwing motion and…well…even being charitable they all threw like the ‘throw like a girl’ stereotype. Luckily I had just put down my drink cuz I would have done a spit take if not when the first girl did her fake throw.


#43

Yeah, Chevy already pretty much owned the “throw like a girl” ad space last summer with their awesome Mo’ne Davis ad.


#44

Yeah, I liked what they were trying to do with that one, but kids earnestly “running” in place or miming a throw without a ball or a fight without an opponent all looked just as goofy as the “like a girl” versions they were supposed to be contrasted against.


#45

Our picture had already cut a few times during pre-game, so it wasn’t quite as amusing on our end. Thankfully no issues during the game!


#46

If you cut all of the craft brew slamming out of the Bud ad it would actually be a good commercial highlighting the craft of Bud. I only caught the end when I saw it in the bar and I liked the historical logo montage. Just stick to the Bud story and don’t sweat the little guys. Act like you’ve been there before.


#47

Yeah, Budweiser actually did buy Elysian last week. I live in Seattle, and we’re pissed off.


#48

No one else liked the centenarians ad from Dodge? OK, they weren’t all quite 100, but close enough. Maybe I just liked it because it was so much better than any of the other car stuff.


#49

I thought that was pretty cool :) In my head, I’m telling myself those lines were actual advice, not just a script.


#50

Plus, who says you throw “like a girl” to a [B]girl[/B]?? It’s an insult from a boy, for a boy, so how does it effect girls’ self esteem??


#51

Are you trolling? You think all the women who watched that ad last night turned to nearby men in bewilderment and asked “Wait, guys say that to each other? I’ve never heard that expression!”?


#52

I’m sure they have heard it, but not directed at them during their younger years. Do you [B]really[/B] think it has effected any young girls?


#53

All I could think–possibly because of the dead kid ad–was this: “Everyone in this ad will be dead next year.”


#54

Effected? No.


#55

OK, then , unless this is just spelling snark…


#56

It was indeed spelling snark. You clarified your position, I disagree with it, but I didn’t know what else to say.


#57

I actually went back and forth with Affected/Effected lol, and even if it less acceptable now, I went with what I was taught, back before color TV:

Something “effects” they, them, or her/him or he/she.

Something “affects” me or us.

And we will agree to disagree on the ad discussion.


#58

Of course it affects them. They hear boys taunting each other using phrases like that all the time, and they know what it means. Regardless of whether someone says it to them directly or not, hearing that tells that that their style of [running/throwing/fighting/whatever] is inferior to that of their male counterparts, and that further they will NEVER do it as well as a boy.


That said, this can be a useful motivator. I coach a girls’ recreational volleyball team in the Spring and Fall, and while there are typically enough girls to fill out the league to six or eight teams, the number of boys that join the rec league for the sport is disappointingly low… typically they only get enough to fill one team.

The boys can mostly jump higher and hit/serve harder than the girls but at that age they have almost no control, so they shank the balls far more than their female counterparts, and often serve out of bounds. The girls regularly beat them because their serves and hits are still plenty hard in addition to being on-target and far more effective. Their teamwork is better too, and that’s pretty vital in the sport.

After a time-out, the teams typically give a little cheer as they break the huddle and go back to their positions. Usually it’s something like "ONE, TWO, THREE – [TEAM NAME]!! " But one of my favorite things to do in these boys-girls games is to have the girls break huddle with “ONE, TWO, THREE – HIT LIKE A GIRL!!!” The girls like the irony.

And yes, I recognize that I’m doing to the boys exactly what I don’t want anyone doing to the girls. It’s arguably worse since these boys are the only ones with enough love for the game to play what is (regionally at least) viewed as a “chicks’ sport” and I may be crushing that out of them. But I do it anyway because I love the look on my girls’ faces after they dismantle a boys’ team.


#59

Reminds me of many years ago when I coached Girls’ High School soccer. We were preparing for a big game vs a girl who was really good in the air and was taller than any of my kids. I borrowed a Boys’ player to simulate the height, and happily watched my kids kick his ass.


#60

It reminds me of the Maxwell House “what the fuck is a French Press?” commercial. The message was basically “if you’re a moron who sneers at things because you don’t understand them, our coffee is for you.”

The motivations are pretty much the same as sneering at microbrews. The real target of the ad isn’t the press, it’s the fresh roasted coffee that’s presumably in the press.