Tell us what's happened to you recently (that's interesting)


#13126

If extensive oral surgery isn’t a legit reason for an IV full of benzos, I don’t know what is. We’re not talking about the administered-by-an-anaesthesiologist-so-you-don’t-die, full-on general that you’d get with, say, open heart surgery.

As I see it, Rich has two options: 1) Roofies. 2) Forcing the issue by becoming hysterical and trying to eat the receptionist.

That said, I had an apicoectomy done a few years back with just a local, and while I wasn’t happy about the prospect, once it was underway it was fine.


#13127

As there will be a meeting the day before the procedure I intend to bring up a few things. Sometimes I feel like I should be less of a big baby at my age and just get through it. Sorry to complain so much.


#13128

I would rather undergo a full physical than visit a dentist. I have no idea why that is but it is true.


#13129

Dental surgery (or any surgery) is no joke! Anxiety is nothing to be ashamed of. It’s well worth any time spent to make sure your dentist knows exactly how you feel beforehand, and if they aren’t responsive to your needs, there are plenty of other dentists to visit.


#13130

Yeah, lots of people get high anxiety when it comes to dentists. I’m still one of them, even if it’s diminished over the years.

I knew a guy who wouldn’t even have his teeth cleaned without Novocaine.


#13131

When I find one that I like, I stick to her for as long as time permits.
Trust is so important on these matters - and a single time with a bad practionner is all it takes to turn you into that acquaintance of Courteous_D.


#13132

http://www.ksdk.com/news/local/woman-rescues-child-trapped-in-car-engulfed-in-flames/467901030

My niece and her husband and their two twin girls saw this accident happen right in front of them on I-70 today, and stopped the car. They had family in another car right behind them, which also stopped (that family stayed with her two twin girls).

Jennifer (that’d be my niece) is an awesome person, a great mom, and a fantastic veterinarian. And seeing all this in front of her, she ran towards the burning car. When she got there she saw a two year old inside and without any other thought reached into the vehicle to pull the baby out. Her husband told their family to stay with the girls and was right behind Jennifer. He saw the driver of the car, get out, and noticed the lady was on fire herself and helped put those flames out.

30 seconds later, the car blew up.

No idea if that poor child will make it, but I’m just in awe of the courage of my niece for running up to a stranger’s car, and reaching in through flames to pull the kid out of it. She herself just got out of surgery for 2nd and 3rd degree burns to her own arms and hands (she’s home and says she’ll be fine) but holy shit. I don’t think I’m that brave. My brother (her dad) asked her why she did it. Her answer? “I’m a mom.”


#13133

That seems like it deserves its own superhero thread instead of merely being interesting! Damn, cheers to your niece for saving that toddler.


#13134

Sadly, I’m not sure the baby will make it. The other text I got from Jennifer was “That baby needs a lot of prayers right now.”


#13135

That’s awful, hopefully she makes it. Doesn’t diminish your niece’s actions in the slightest though.


#13136

Thanks for the story. We need all the superheroes we can get. Thank your niece! She’s awesome!


#13137

I don’t think any one of us knows that we’re capable of something like that until we’re called upon.

Amazing story, and many kudos to her, and prayers to the child.


#13138

Well, that’s tough to follow!

I am moving soon, and one of the worst thing is I am going to have to say goodbye to my baker’s rye bread. He mills his own flour and uses it exclusively. This is the single best bread I have ever eaten in my life, and this may sound silly, but not being able to enjoy it is one of those very saddening things about our move.
Today, he offered to send me his beloved bread regularly to my new place. I was so happy I almost cried.
I know it’s not very interesting, but it was capital to me and I needed to share my joy. There!


#13139

@Left_Empty, that’s totally interesting. There have been two places in my life that have made food in, well, I suppose you might call it “their own way,” and dang if leaving them hasn’t always been something of a sadness.

When the day-5 food thoughts start when I’m in the backcountry, it usually starts with one of those two places. You are so very blessed to have that offer! What a cool thing for the man to do!


#13140

That’s an amazing story, and you have an amazing neice.


#13141

Bread can be funny. We had some marvelous bread when we were in Italy back in March. It was spongy in texture, almost an airiness, yet still chewy. In Rome we were a few blocks from the Colosseum and bought sandwiches made with this bread a couple of times at a small deli, just simple fare of bread, meat, and cheese - no condiments or lettuce, yet delicious. We even asked the deli owner why the food was so good in Italy. After a moment while he summoned up the words he said, “Government…Mafia. Church…Mafia. Mafia…Mafia. Mafia like good food!”

So back in St. Louis we searched for it. We went to The Hill, the Italian section of town where they still publish a newspaper in Italian. Some old-timers still there who emigrated from Italy and a lot of 2nd, 3rd, and 4th generation Italians there. It’s where Yogi Berra and Joe Garagiola grew up. Could not find it there at any of the bakeries.

Then this past weekend we were doing a day trip to winery country and we decided to wander, and we turned off the main road to follow a sign to a small resort that’s owned by one of the old money families in St. Louis, the Vatterotts. People have weddings there now, etc. So we drive up to this small resort modeled to look like an Old West town and go to the restaurant there for lunch, and on the menu they tout their “world famous bread.” So we order and when it arrives…it’s the same kind of bread we had in Italy!

So we know where to go for it now, though it’s a 90 minute drive. At least it’s a nice drive to wine country. We’ll make it now and then.


#13142

Man when I lived in St Louis, on the Hill no less, many years ago (left in '89), we had a grocer on the corner who had this bread that he stored in the freezer with no wrapping or anything and he called it “shampa” and it was like someone started to kneed it and then forgot to roll it out. It had all these “knobs” protruding from it and once it thawed, you would tear off a piece and be in Heaven. Damn you just made me remember how much I miss that bread.

Googling just now, it appears Missouri Baking Company may make it.


#13143

Life goal to someday be rich enough to retire, move to The Hill, and simply eat myself to death slowly on the amazing food there.


#13144

I bought my house on Magnolia (6258 to be precise) for 50K in 1986 and sold it for 55K in 1987. Zillow now says it’s worth $138K.

For the record, while Zillow states it’s only 1 bedroom, it was 4 when I was there, but the stairway to go upstairs went though a room off the kitchen which I called my office, but was another bedroom. Maybe new owners remodeled it?


#13145

We kegged our first batch of New England IPA today, and we managed to lose a gasket in the first keg. Due to many things going on, and not being 100% sure if the gasket was in the keg (NEIPA is a cloudy brew) we just used the lid from another keg. Having realized this meant we were down one keg that was needed for a red ale that is fermenting, I have now transferred the beer to another keg and recovered the gasket.

This is what went wrong: Due to not having equalized the pressure enough before opening the CO2-filled keg to fill it it with beer, the gasket probably got stuck under the hole and fell down, instead of staying on the lid.