The war on marijuana


#41

*wipes away tear* You guys make me so proud sometime. Also yes this is a 14-day-old quote. DealWithIt.gif


#42

I think that the news website alarmism is a bit annoying with this particular study, which provides only correlation, but still interesting research anyway. I think most people use far less than the 1200mg daily that the study says is a dangerous level.


#43

So Trump signed H.R. 244 into law today, and in the signing order is something that could turn out to be a pretty big deal depending:

https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/05/05/statement-president-donald-j-trump-signing-hr-244-law

Division B, section 537 provides that the Department of Justice may not use any funds to prevent implementation of medical marijuana laws by various States and territories. I will treat this provision consistently with my constitutional responsibility to take care that the laws be faithfully executed.

Translation: “Screw Congress, it’s my constitutional duty to raid (probably recreational) dispensaries.”


So I guess 2016 claimed its biggest victim yet - America
#44

I continue to find stuff like this utterly baffling. Especially considering the rampant drug and alcohol abuse among these rich, white Republicans, and their allies. The hypocrisy is strong. Beyond that, though, I truly wonder what fairyland these people live in where weed smoking is somehow an issue that should even cross the horizon of the nation’s chief executive. It’s pretty widely known that the contemporary war on drugs began as Nixon’s attempt to fragment and attack the liberal anti-war, pro-civil rights movement by cracking down not on speech and political acts, but on cultural trappings, one of which was marijuana. Then again, I guess this DOES explain why this president and his cronies are so obsessed with it. They are continuing to use it as a way to attack their political foes.

Of course, I guess no one told them that all those bubbas in Arkansas that voted for Trump also grow weed back in the Ozarks, as that’s probably the only cash crop they got any more. Certainly in Georgia, back in the seventies, the old moonshiners had switched to weed as much more profitable.


#45

And how do you think they like having to compete with legalized product?


#46

Heh, good point, though I doubt the train of logic goes that far for the folks in Congress; that would make them deliberate accessories to criminal enterprises.

Hmm, come to think of it, maybe you’re right…


#47

Oh don’t worry Trump is socially a Democrat on these kinds of issues they said.


#48

To be fair, next week he could change his mind. He seems to be, um, less than consistent.


#49

He might, but head of the Department of Justice (for white Christian people) Jefferson Beauregard Sessions will not bend to those uppity liberals, minorities, and city folk.


#50

Hasn’t there been a history of the war against marijuana being a proxy for racism going back to 1930 when Harry J. Anslinger was appointed as the founder of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics? Terry Gross had a fantastic interview with John Hudak, author of ‘Marijuana: A Short History’, which highlights how marijuana was painted as a drug used by ‘undesirable’ people [code for: we get to be racists]:

Anslinger brought to it this real racialized aspect. I mean, he was an absolute avowed racist, and when you look at the letters he wrote to different civic organizations or op-eds that he published, or even congressional testimony, it is riddled with racist language and racist claims about the use of marijuana really being only in Mexican communities in the Southwest, and then eventually it transitioned to be a product that was used by the individuals who were around jazz music, which of course was code language for the African-American community.

And so proceeded this racialized history, and [Anslinger] … claimed that marijuana would turn people into psychopaths, murderers, rapists — it would make women promiscuous, particularly promiscuous around men of color, and this was seen as something that was brought into communities by people of color in order to make the most vulnerable in society behave in ways that would appall society.

Many of the myths and outright lies of Anslinger still linger in people’s perceptions to this day about how dangerous marijuana is.


#51

True enough; Nixon just brought it into the more mainstream play book of the GOP.


#52

Heh. Oh too true. But not all white, Christian people, you know. I’m pretty sure non-Evangelical protestants from the South don’t count either.


#53

If the GOP wants to get serious about something that might cause more millennials to vote in the midterms, that’s fine with me. Please proceed, Attorney General.


#54

Probably not, my thought was that they’ll probably not lose those votes if they stop decriminalizing marijuana.


#55

I remember hearing that the first time California tried to legalize weed (4 or 5 years ago?) the successful ‘No’ campaign was funded primarily by medical MJ dispensaries- they didn’t want the competition. Might be BS, though.


#56

The reefer will make the White women start listening to the jazz music, and before you know it, they’ll be having sexual relations with the NEGROS!


#57

No idea, but I can bet you that big pharma has zero interest in legal marijuana, because it will damn sure cut into not only pain meds but antidepressants and a whole bunch of other lines that are not as effective for some people as weed is.

Hell, the best way (in terms of politics, not necessarily what’s good) to get backing for legalized marijuana is to figure out a way for the big pharmaceutical companies to make a killing on it.


#58

Here’s their profit, we don’t put their backs against the wall when the medical system collapses.

Sorry, feeling a bit ornery today.


#59

No need to apologize to me. I know too many dear people whose lives are made bearable by medical marijuana to balk at your suggestion. Metaphorically speaking. Mostly.

And I have witnessed far, far too much tragedy from rampant alcohol abuse to doubt for a minute that we’d be much better off with comparatively more tokers than boozers.


#60

But…but the slippery slope!

I actually think it’s a little less slippery once you legalize it. When it’s illegal and someone uses it, they’ve already declared themselves an outlaw, so why not try other illegal things? And they already know someone willing to supply illegal drugs. I wouldn’t even know where to get marijuana these days, much less anything else.

And I agree about the alcohol. People are more prone to being aggressive when drunk compared to stoned.