Will you care about the dame in Max Payne 2?

Other then PS:T - Manny Calavera in Grim Fandango. I wish for a sequel to hear him again, and I wish there wont be a sequel because it will probably suck.

I feel the same way.

That’s another game with great writing and real voice actors who were obviously together in the studio, responding to one another. Glottis and Manny are both amazingly well-realized characters, as are pretty much all the others, right down to the bored, sarcastic clown who sells the balloon animals.

What’s the point of a love story in a shooter computer game? It’s about as relevant as a plot in a porn movie.

If I can develop emotional attachment to a character in a 2-hour movie, I think I can do it in a 6-hour game.

I was pretty sad when Aeris died in Final Fantasy VII. That’s the last time I can think of actually being moved at all about a game character, one way or another. Besides just the whole “hey gee aren’t I a badass” kind of moved.

Planescape: Torment

Totally got immersed in the story and totally cared about the characters. Also, I might add, PS:T has got some of the best music ever written for a computer game. It still gets me when the music softly switches over to an extremely beautiful and haunting version of the main theme when you approach Deionarra at the beginning.[/quote]

I loved Torment but I wasn’t real interested in the love story… just curious about who the Nameless One really was.

Did you see those Outtakes they released? One of them redid that scene, except that this time the twon-ha crapped in front of him, leading to the response “<BLEEP>. WILL SOMEONE GET THIS <BLEEP>ING ANIMAL OUT OF HERE BEFORE I KICK IT IN THE STOMACH UNTIL IT DIES?!”[/quote]

The outtakes kicked ass. Nikkaa’s audition was another highlight, and who can forget the stunt-double-and-close-personal-friend scene :D

Man, that game had everything.

…and there will never be a sequel. :cry:

Anachronox-- I really loved those characters, and the tragic romantic sub-plot of Boots and Fatima.

Not many games are big into character development… Max Payne certainly wasn’t. It’s hard to feel emotionally invested when the presentation of the story is so damned over-the-top corny.

But I’ve played plenty of games that made me care about their characters. The Longest Journey had great characters. The Fallouts, and Arcanum. Ultima VII. Etc.

I agree that a love story would be a tough thing to pull off in a game, though. And I doubly agree that Max Payne 2 has about a snowball’s chance in hell of doing it. If they can even make cut scenes that don’t make me snicker, I’ll be impressed.

I feel the same way.

That’s another game with great writing and real voice actors who were obviously together in the studio, responding to one another. Glottis and Manny are both amazingly well-realized characters, as are pretty much all the others, right down to the bored, sarcastic clown who sells the balloon animals.[/quote]

Ditto.

I loved the Wumpus*.

[size=2]*Not in the biblical sense, of course.[/size]

Sam Lake has been interviewed saying the script for MP2 is three times as long as for MP1. So maybe that’ll be enough development for you jaded bastards. :)

I thought the original MP did a fine job of storytelling. The dream sequences sold the caring parts for me. No, it wasn’t a tear-jerking mess where I’m blubbering at the keyboard when Michelle and the baby die over and over, but that didn’t mean I didn’t care.

You’re all just heartless bastards. :lol:

Good.
Twice as many horribly tasteless shots of a bloody crib and twice as much wonderful dialogue. I can’t wait.

Anachronox-- I really loved those characters, and the tragic romantic sub-plot of Boots and Fatima.

I totally forget about that, but yeah that was something that really worked. The game did a good job stringing you along, not quite explaining why their relationship is the way it is. Then there’s a pretty effective cutscene explaining the back story. Nice stuff there.

It wasn’t the length that bothered me.

I can only regard the script for MP1 as a parody of noir-type writing; nothing that bad could be unintentionally so. I kept waiting for a sentence without a horrible simile and it just never came.

Even the name of the woman seems ripped off of the main female character in Michael Chabon’s The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, which chronicles two comic book moguls, and comic-book-style art popped up all the time in MP1 if I’m not mistaken.

I also would like to voice my compliment on the Boots/Fatima relationship.

Really takes you by surprise. Damn we could use more games like that one.

Yeah, but the Max Payne writing is never funny in an over-the-top way. If they were going for parody, they missed and hit simply awful. Here’s noir parody:

“Darkness washed over the Dude…darker than a black steer’s tookus on a moonless prairie night…there was no bottom.”

Here’s Max:

“The sun went down with practiced bravado. Twilight crawled across the sky, laden with foreboding.”

There’s just nothing funny about it. It’s just bad.

The Germans like the game though.

The essay examines genre discourses in the action game Max Payne (2001). It draws attention to notions of space, time, and bodies by positioning the game in relation to Hollywood action movies. This entails an examination of the technological specifity of the cinematic and game apparatus respectively. Aesthetic and narrative properties of the action genre are then being related to a parallel construction prevailing in the complex aesthetics of the sublime and the beautiful, a theory which foregrounds gendered power relations. I argue that gaming technologies mediate presence in historically and culturally specific ways, allowing male users to experience their subject function in distinct ways. Therefore, an intertextual examination of the computer gaze allows a reappraisal of computer-generated environments in terms of cultural constructions of identity.

http://www.dichtung-digital.com/2002/03-22-Gunzenhaeuser.htm

The actual essay is in German, which I consider to be a good thing, since I can’t read German.

Totally. Though I actually did laugh at it quite a bit, in a bizarre “this is too serious to be a parody and as such is the stupidest writing I’ve encountered in a genre that embraces and proudly wears stupid writing on its sleeve” kind of way.

I wonder if the “hit bullet-time button, jump laterally, shoot poor bastard” gameplay will be fun the second time around, after I’ve already screwed with the temporal order enough in Viewtiful Joe and Prince of Persia, and the whole “you know, like the Matrix!” aspect of bullet-time is now “ugh, like the freaking Matrix”.

That essay is actually not such a bad read. We’re not talking about fan fiction here or something like that, which would be rather obscure. It describes a number of design principles and choices and uses Max Payne as example.

I liked the game, too. The bullet time was neat, though the shtick got a bit old by the end. The level design was mostly pretty solid. It was a decent shooter. But the writing and the story were awful.