Wisdom and Aphorisms from President Trump: Great Leader, Great Teacher, Great Supreme Commander, Great Helmsman of our Nation


#21086

They both are used to demean and diminish the target. The underlying motives are the differentiator. Trump due to being a complete piece of shit and, for many, Obama because he was black.


#21087

Holy shit dude, get a grip. Shit, is that also a secret racist phrase I just used?


#21088

Not to ask for an example, but I even live in the South and need some sort of example for what you are referring to. I understand completely the reference to calling someone a, “boy,” for example. I’ve even heard old racist statements referring to someone with slave like names. But Barry? Or by their first name? He actually used Barry for a while as his name. I’m lost on the connection to it being racist. Evidently I have some learning to do.


#21089

There’s a lot of context being forgotten in this thread. ‘Barry’ was what Obama actually went by for quite some time. When used in a place like a (non-racist) internet forum, I always saw it as a way to make him familiar and closer. The far-right was always way more likely to call him Barak HUSSEIN Obama. I don’t think Trump ever went by Donnie, and its use usually seems an attempt to make him sound childish. As if he needs any help…


#21090

I agree and to what stummer said:

Surely it’s the diminishing of someone as President because they don’t like them, not that they are referring to their past name in a racist context?


#21091

In short, the idea is that black men are not men, so they are called by their first names, in particular by child nicknames. Obama stopped using Barry when he was 19.

Thank you for that wise contribution.

Here’s a reference to the wider topic of what it means to call people of color by their first name, never mind a nickname.

https://www.npr.org/2017/11/30/567572923/how-two-women-fought-to-be-called-miss-and-ms


#21092

Man I’m certainly not on top of the game of understanding, so I’ll defer to others here. In my eyes though, that’s a bit of a stretch to be racist. “Donnie or Don,” for Trump? “George or W,” for Bush, etc? “Slick Willy,” for Clinton?

Are they all not just a way to demean the President?


#21093

This is a movie, Barry, about Barack Obama. That was his name for a time. I don’t really see an issue here.


#21094

Sure, but they don’t carry the same connotation because they don’t have the same history. And I don’t doubt for a minute that the impetus to push ‘Barry’ was racist. Do you doubt it?


#21095

I don’t see any reason to believe that the usage of the name Barry in this thread was intended to be racist at all.


#21096

Who said it was?


#21097

I doubt it.


#21098

Yeah, and there’s a thing called context. There are many non-racist reasons why you might call a person by their first name or a nickname. It must be something to have your mind jump to the most racially charged interpretation of every social interaction.


#21099

Based on how Trump seemed to have brought racism out of the half-hidden GOP shadows into the full light, I would lend -some- credence to it being used in a racist way. That being said, as I mentioned, it gives me pause if the use of a first name can be taken that strongly as being demeaning to some.


#21100

Of course there are. There are non-racist reasons why you might call someone boy, too, but that doesn’t make it okay in this context, does it?

Thank you for that.


#21101

Is it OK to use a person’s race as a tool to dress somebody down and score points in an internet discussion? Nobody was talking about race until you brought it up.


#21102

Have you stopped beating your children?


#21103

I don’t have children but that’s a pretty shitty thing to say to a person.


#21105

Guys it’s a variant of “have you stopped beating your wife,” meant to point out a question whose premises are unfair, not a specific insult.


#21106

He’s not accusing anybody of anything. It’s a rhetorical device, demonstrating that your statement assumed something that may or may not have been true, but with a phrasing that’s impossible to refute without sidestepping the question.