Woman helps save gunshot victim, gets fired for her troubles

Erik’s right. Some private party will probably step in and reward her for the inadvertant good samaritan work though.

The pizza shop probably has never run into this kind of problem before.

I see Erik/Ben/Jason’s point, but this isn’t like someone with a police scanner. She wasn’t looking for trouble, so to speak. Her friend happened to get the call. I don’t see how it’s different if you come upon a victim on the street. I mean, I think everyone agrees that if this woman is delivering pizza and the customer keels over, she should be able to help. It seems like people agree that if she’s driving along and some third party keels over on the street (or is in a car wreck, or whatever), she should also be able to help. Once you agree to that, I don’t see the difference. What if she delivers a pizza and the neighbor keels over in his yard? What if she sees someone keel over down the block?

Is this situation different because she had to drive to the scene? What about the fact that she was driving there anyway to drop her friend off?

It seems like if you’re on the job and find out that someone needs medical help, and they’re not far away (or not far from where you’re going anyway), you should be able to help them. I mean, you can’t help but get the feeling that the pizza place wasn’t firing her because she gave her friend a ride home, they fired her because she spent hours giving someone first aid and then making a report to the cops. If she had dropped her friend off and said “good luck helping this guy” and gone back to work, I’m assuming she would still be employed. If so, that’s lame.

I should have actually read the article:

'McAulay was on a shift for Frank’s Pizza in Selkirk, some 30 kilometres north of Winnipeg, on Feb. 26 when a friend who was riding with her received a call that there had been a shooting near her home.

McAulay planned to drop her friend off, but the situation escalated quickly when she stopped her car near the shooting scene.

“One of the victims opened up the door and yelled at me to come and help him. Another man was on the floor and was bleeding quite badly,” she said.’

So she was dropping her friend off (a jaywalking offense in pizza delivery; trust me, I did it for years). Unless she was worst employee evar, they wouldn’t have fired her for just dropping a friend off on shift.

A reasonable business would say “thanks for the good PR, but please don’t waste time dropping off your friends.” An idiot business would fire her, making themselves look like fucking heartless morons.

Apparently they subscribed to Jakub’s School of PR.

Well, yeah.

Once you agree to that, I don’t see the difference. What if she delivers a pizza and the neighbor keels over in his yard? What if she sees someone keel over down the block?

The difference is that in all of the examples that you give, she is already there, or close enough that it makes no real difference. You seem to be arguing that the distance that she has to travel to render the aid is irrelevant. What if she gets a call from a friend in Japan? Should she dump her undelivered pizzas in the street and head to the airport?

That’s an extreme example, but I’d still argue that there is a tangible difference between stopping to render aid when you see a stranger get injured right in front of you and driving across town to render aid to a stranger after receiving a phone call. In the former case, you stop and help because you are the closest help available. In the latter case, I’m not sure why you would rush to the scene rather than call 911.

What about the fact that she was driving there anyway to drop her friend off?

I’m guessing that she wasn’t supposed to be giving friends rides around town while she was on the clock, so that’s hardly a point in her favor from the pizza store owner’s point of view.

A reasonable business would say “thanks for the good PR, but please don’t waste time dropping off your friends.” An idiot business would fire her, making themselves look like fucking heartless morons.

I agree, though I’d also point out that we know very little about the situation aside from what that one very slanted newspaper article said. What if she has a history of blowing off work and acting generally irresponsibly while on the clock? Or maybe she’s a saint and the pizza store owner is just an asshole. We don’t really know, and that heartwarming but sensationalistic article doesn’t offer much insight.

Not to get in an enormous argument about some pizza delivery girl, but I still don’t totally understand Ben’s argument. I agree that the distance is relevant and she shouldn’t fly to Japan to save someone. My point is that she was already at the house where this happened. She didn’t drive anywhere extra to attend to the victim. I understand that she’s not supposed to be at the house in the first place, but what I’m saying is that that, in itself, is probably not a firing offense. Like I said above, if she’d dropped off the friend and left the guy to die (or there had been no shooting to begin with), my assumption is that her boss would have said “Hey, don’t be driving people around while you’re on the clock” and that would have been it.

In other words, she doesn’t get fired because she dropped a friend off. She gets fired because, while dropping a friend off, she elected to stay and administer first aid to a shooting victim and then make a report afterwards. It’s THAT delay that gets her canned. Presumably, if she had been delivering a pizza and the next-door neighbor had gotten shot and she had stayed there, she would have gotten fired as well, on the same “I’m not paying her to be an EMT” logic. Right?

In other other words, the following set of rules makes no sense to me:

  • Give aid to someone you stumble across: not fired.
  • Drive someone home: not fired.
  • Drive someone home, then give aid to someone you stumble across: fired.

Also, way to entirely ignore the last paragraph of my post, there.