Airplane pr0n


#221

He sounds a whole lot more relaxed than I would!


#222

I would be smiling too loudly to speak.


#223

That brings some sweet memories of sims of yore…


#224

Sigh… zip


#225

#226

Wooo that’s my city!! And the buildings with QUT on them (Queensland University of Technology) are where I obtained my Aerospace Engineering degree - which later on let me spend two years as a design engineer on the C-17. So it’s nice to see them both in the same video :)

We used to have F-111s doing their dump-and-burn trick along the Brisbane River for Riverfire each year, but with their retirement a few years back the RAAF have been pulling out all the stops to make up for it… and a C-17 at below-building-height is definitely a step in the right direction!


#227

Man, even your festivals are freaking metal in Australia? So unfair.


#228


#229

Can someone explain to me what’s happening here? It looks like a plane is vomiting a plane.


#230

No, no. It is a plane swallowing another plane. :)


#231

That is the fuselage of a unidentified plane, possibly a C-130, being loaded into a C-5m Super Galaxy


#232

Not a 130, it’s a C-27 spartan. The plane eating it is a C-5M.


#233

It’s actually not an M Model C-5, it’s either a A or more likely a B model. It’s tough to tell the models apart if you’re not really familiar with the differences. The M models have new engines which don’t have the extended cone coming out of the back.

As to what is happening @CraigM is closest, it’s a C-130 fuselage being loaded onto a C-5 for transport. This is actually very rare as we (USAF) do not really fly our planes in our other planes (it’s way to expensive and inefficient)


#234

Consider me schooled.

Yo dog, I heard you like airplanes, so I put a plane in your plane.


#235

Personnel unload cargo from a C-5 Galaxy at Pegasus Field, an ice runway near McMurdo Station, Antarctica.

I put your plane on ice.


#236

#237

Nice.

Mr Il-76P does not take kindly to your shit.


#238

#239

Changing planes in Chicago yesterday, I snapped a phone pic of the Butch O’Hare Wildcat. This aircraft was recovered from the bottom of Lake Michigan (several still reside there from WWII training accidents) and restored to the specs of the F4F-3 that O’Hare flew from the carrier Lexington in the Battle of the Coral Sea. The plane is displayed as if about to land on a carrier, with flaps, landing gear and tail hook down. If you’re tall enough, you can see that the top of the pedestal is painted to resemble a carrier deck.

Wildcat


#240

Wildcats are so ugly and pretty at the same time that I’m always conflicted when I see one.