Tell us what you have cooked lately (that's interesting)


#8233

Christien I would love that recipe if you’d share it. We occasionally do a stovetop version of it, usually to use up some beef leftovers in some way. It’s good but could be better.


#8234

Pressure cooker > slow cooker


#8235

By all means share the recipe, my son would probably like it. We could maybe convert it to a pressure cooker version. My issue with the slow cooker is it dries out the meat. My issue with the pressure cooker is converting recipes so they have enough liquid then cooking off said liquid after pressure cooking it.


#8236

Ymm, that looks good. I like the combination of creme / custard and fruit.


#8237

I never thought to add raisins to apple pie. I like raisins in breads (especially cinnamon bread), so it probably works in pie too.


#8238

Randy, that spread looks so good! I printed out your mac and cheese recipe last year but we haven’t tried it yet. I looks sooo delicious - and probably deadly :-)


#8239

That looks good Nesrie and like it wouldn’t take years off of my life!


#8240

My wife makes a really good roast butternut squash dish with extra sharp cheddar cheese, rosemary, thyme and breadcrumbs. One of my favorite veggie dishes.


#8241

I got a Sous Vide for Christmas (Anova Nano, bluetooth only) and used it to cook up some shrimp that I had shelled and prepped. It worked fine! I took some of the shrimp and added it to a risotto that my wife was making. The rest I breaded and fried up for a guest’s child who wouldn’t eat risotto.

All in all, a good first attempt. We don’t eat beef, but plan on using this for poultry, seafood and veggies. Any cookbook recommendations? Or just use the internet?


#8242

Thank you, man!

These days I’m usually subbing in goat cheese for the blue cheese, as most of my diners prefer the creamier texture over the extra hit of flavor (alas), and I’m always playing around with the milk/cream ratio trying to find just the right mixture of richness and not-killing-myself-by-40-ness. If you ever do give it a shot, please let us know!


#8243

The only real site you need:

It’s phenomenal.


#8244

I will mention it here for sure. I like goat cheese quite a bit and not a fan of blue so that substitution would be great for me.

Speaking of cheese, have you ever had raclette? It is so good. While I think it is typically a particular variety of cheese, it can be done with more than one kind. My wife bought a raclette maker here in France that we are going to bring home. You melt the cheese and then pour it over sliced potatoes and / or meat. We’ve been eating a lot of cheese in France. We also found a pizza place here that is so good. They use cream in their sauce, along with tomatoe. It is very rich and yummy. Ummm, I’ve gained 10 pounds in 7 months.


#8245

Seconded.


#8246

I usually use Raclette, but Comte or Morbier will work in a pinch.Or Reblochon, I guess, but at that point you might as well make tartiflette. Highly recommend accompanying the potatoes with saucisson sec and cornichons/gherkins.


#8247

Never managed to have raclette, though I’ve seen videos of that ooey gooey melting-sliding/scraping dealio that make my mouth absolutely water. It’s something I’d like to try properly done at a restaurant to gauge how much I need to be willing to shell out precious kitchen space and cash to be able to replicate it at home. . .

Though I suppose I could just try the cheese itself anytime I wanted to :)


#8248

You don’t really need specialist equipment (though I admit I do use it). You can just put the cheese on little trays under a broiler.


#8249

Excellent, thank you!


#8250

Cold martinis and melted cheese. I will die happy.


#8251

I’l third @Tman’s suggestion for Serious Eats site for any sous vide recipe you need. I’ve had pretty good success with poultry, which I use it for the most. I have only used a true vacuum sealed bag one time, the rest have all been Ziploc freezer bags with the air removed via partial immersion. If needed, an office binder clip with a heavy utensil weighing it down can keep your bag below the water line and stable versus moving around.
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Another sous vide fan near me told me his mantra and I agree with it: flavor in = flavor out. Butter doesn’t do much in sous vide bags or for flavor. However, salt, pepper, rub, fresh herbs, slices of citrus, etc all do a lot for flavor out of the end result. Much more so than other cooking methods in my humble opinion. Pairing that with a good sear or browning and you’re all set.

Even if you guys aren’t beef fans, big and cheap cuts of meat really shine in sous vide. Perhaps a pork roast or shoulder?


#8252

Yeah. It seems that butter will actually draw out natural fat from meat, in the process removing flavor. I’ll have to find the video where I first saw that mentioned.