The opioid crisis


#101

Obviously, nobody can be surprised that he only paid lip service to this.

The silver lining that some of the swing states particularly Ohio, but also Michigan have a very serious problem. I hope the Democrats plaster the state with Trump’s bullshit words, the actual facts about funding, and lots of pictures of dead overdoses victims and grieving family members.


#102

Same playbook as mass shooting or other not-really-problems, just use thoughts and prayers.


#103

As Sarah Huckabee Sanders said last week, “All hat, no cattle”.


#104

The Justice Department claims that Kapoor and other Insys executives offered bribes in the form of kickbacks to doctors who wrote “large numbers of prescriptions” for patients, many of whom did not have cancer. The Department also alleged that the executives defrauded insurers by forming a “reimbursement unit” dedicated to obtaining prior authorization from insurers who were reluctant to pay for the drug.

“These Insys executives allegedly fueled the opioid epidemic by paying doctors to needlessly prescribe an extremely dangerous and addictive form of fentanyl,” Phillip Coyne, special agent in charge for the Office of Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, said in a press release.


#105

Pharma execs arrested? Yeah. Something tells me a high falutin’ lawyer will be speakin’ up for em with the Sheriff. All hat, no cattle.


#106

Wow this is nuts:

In the new trial, Chang and colleagues enrolled 411 patients who arrived in one of two Bronx, New York, emergency rooms with acute pain in a limb. The enrolled patients were all between 18 and 64 years old, cleared of complicating health conditions, had no history of allergies or signs of opioid addiction, and were on no medications that might interact with the pain treatments. When they arrived, the patients had a mean pain score of 8.7 on a standard 11-point scale.

Researchers then randomly assigned the patients to get one of four pain-pill combinations: 400mg of ibuprofen and 1,000mg of acetaminophen; 5mg of oxycodone and 325mg of acetaminophen; 5mg of hydrocodone and 300mg of acetaminophen; or 30mg of codeine and 300mg of acetaminophen. Each of the pill combinations looked identical to the patients—three opaque capsules.

Two hours later, the patients scored their pain again. There were no statistically significant differences in pain reduction across the four groups. Mean scores dropped by 4.3 with ibuprofen and acetaminophen; 4.4 with oxycodone and acetaminophen; 3.5 with hydrocodone and acetaminophen; and 3.9 with codeine and acetaminophen. The biggest difference between any two of the groups was 0.9—oxycodone and acetaminophen vs hydrocodone and acetaminophen—which is not a clinically significant difference in pain level.


#107

The placebo effect is real and really powerful, I imagine a sugar pill would have resulted in pain reduction but maybe not as much.


#108

#109

Well that’s solved, then.


#110

Jared whipped the crisis into shape and now he’s turning it over to someone who can keep the ball rolling!


#111

Conway is one of the reasons that people resort to opioids in the first place.


#112

What, exactly, is her job again? Does she even have an official title at this point?


#113

I will say - without irony - that Conway is one of the more competent people currently working at the White House.

Obviously you’d prefer that they would have brought in a medical or law enforcement expert with deep knowledge of the crisis and some innovative ideas on how to combat it. But if we can’t have that I’d prefer Conway over, say, Eric.


#114

Wow and people have accused me of being overly optimistic about the Trump White House. Not that you are wrong, but still!


#115

If the White House was smart they’d appoint this man to run the crisis.

An ER doc who’s son was a recent casualty. I’d loved his advice to parents and love ones, trying to deal with addiction.
Get two things a dose of Narcan, “It is a miracle drug the person can be dying before your eyes and few seconds later they are talking. Also get a sledgehammer if they lock the bathroom door on you.”


#116

Hmm. I worry that my cynicism and Trump-weariness was not adequately communicated. Let me try again:

Kellyanne Conway is one of the few White House denizens who would potentially be better than the null option for combating the opioid crisis. Jared pretty much WAS the null option in that he’s been leading the effort for ten months and has accomplished precisely nothing; a jar full of pocket lint would have been equally effective. But there are several characters lurking in Trump’s shadow that would probably achieve less than nothing in that same position.


#117

Her only skill is lying. I’m not sure that is going to help anyone who is addicted to heroin.

They could’ve picked Ben Carson, at least he has a medical degree. At best Conway looks like she is a user.


#118

KellyAnn does look and act like she is on cocaine pretty often. On the hand, Tin is righ,t unlike many of folks in Trump’s inner circle, Conway does have some serious skills. She is a very talented publicist and an effective spokesman. If by some miracle some good ideas on how to combat the opioid crises get developed, KellyAnn will be effective at getting them seen by the public.


#119

This. Forum. Needs. A. Like. Button.


#120

not as sexy I guess, or, you know, white leaning.