How tall are you?


#61

I’m 6’, just a little shy of 6’1". My son towers over me though, he’s 6’7" and only just turned 18 so he may even still grow more, who knows. He eats like he’s going through a growth spurt, that’s for sure.


#62

Scholarship! (Sorry the financial planner in me always goes to tuition)


#64

Yep, on it. :)


#65

5’8".

Sadly shorter than mom, and little sister. They assure me it’s better that I am shorter.


#66

5’10"


#67

1.03 pinards.


#68

1.01 pinards. I think.


#69

6’1 (maybe 2).
Living in the Netherlands, I never felt super tall, but that changed when I went to the US for college.

Being Dutch is a little bit like cheating. We are the tallest people in the world (on average), but let’s face, without mountains, being tall is necessary to spot roving Viking.


#70

There is not a big difference there. I didn’t feel any shorter in the Netherlands than I do here.

you and I are the same height, and I’ve never felt particularly tall. just slightly above average, unless I’m somewhere with a mostly Hispanic or Indian staff/ clientele.


#71

Same here. As a kid I was taller than most, but as an adult I may be taller, but not by that much.


#72

This thread has caused to arise in me a burning question: what is the conversion factor of frops to pinards? Or am I confusing units?


#73

I’m a picard +1. I’m also glad I came into this thread as I got a real chortle from Fishbreath’s temperature unit comparison chart.


#74

5’3 and if i read it correctly the shortest here.

But as im a proud jungle Asian im actually average height when i head back to my ancestral lands.


#75

As I understand it, a frop is a measurement of time. Think of it like the opposite of a lightyear.


#76

That’s why I felt giant in Malaysia! I’d be walking down the street or through the mall and it looked like a sea of the top of people’s heads. When you’d occasionally meet someone who was 5’7" or so, it was kinda jarring.


#77

Besides what @MattN mentioned, it is also important to note the relationship between a frop(time) a pinard(distance) and a qute (QT3 measure for speed.)

Using the Qute Pinard Frop formula, we can then solve for any third missing piece:
image

So to solve for qute, one would divide pinard by frop. And by design, the multiplication of qute and frop give results in pinard. The use of said formula is now being taught in some prominent Northeastern magnet schools.


#78

F5A23F65-1DA5-4067-89EC-DF25EDEDC0E3


#79

This is fucking art.


#80

Dr. Skipper PhD, pioneering the field of Amphibiomathematicus :)


#81

Absolutely awesomaticus.

image